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Luc Lewitanski
. killed its Reader in 2013 because RSS as a format gives readers agency, doesn't track browsing to sell ads, and lets the user chose what they want to read. As opposed to algorithmic personalisation which siloes us into increasingly homogenous demographics for advertisers
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Emory Roane 3 Jul 18
Replying to @LucLewitanski @Google
So piggybacking on this serendipitous discussion, RSS reader of choice in 2018?
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Sah Luss 4 Jul 18
For text RSS feeds, Feedly. For audio RSS feeds, Pocket Casts.
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Ryan Kailath 3 Jul 18
Replying to @LucLewitanski
do you have receipts
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dusoft 3 Jul 18
Replying to @LucLewitanski @Google
It would be possible to innovate it to allow some kind of analytics. Stats are not bad, if they are anonymous.
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Luc Lewitanski 3 Jul 18
Replying to @Orangwutang @Google
It was against their interest to try. Google made a big push into personalisation in 2009. They accustomed audiences to tailored results because it made it easier to target content and ads to them. Google’s profit centre comes from matching you with sophisticated advertisements.
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Carlos Olin Montalvo 3 Jul 18
Replying to @LucLewitanski @Google
Feedly rules
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Kalim Fleet 3 Jul 18
Also people forget, Reader had a social component built in. You could create a group of people and share a feed.
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Claire Ryan 3 Jul 18
I miss this feature.
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frontier_anon 3 Jul 18
Replying to @LucLewitanski @Google
Google and others would love to see all the standard open and license-free protocols that enable and empower people to suffer a similar fate. Thankfully SMTP, RSS, DNS, x509 PKI endure
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Jake Hamby 3 Jul 18
I remember when Gchat supported XMPP; Google announced they were shutting that protocol down the month before they shut down Google Reader.
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