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Luc Lewitanski
. killed its Reader in 2013 because RSS as a format gives readers agency, doesn't track browsing to sell ads, and lets the user chose what they want to read. As opposed to algorithmic personalisation which siloes us into increasingly homogenous demographics for advertisers
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Luc Lewitanski 3 Jul 18
Replying to @Orangwutang @Google
It was against their interest to try. Google made a big push into personalisation in 2009. They accustomed audiences to tailored results because it made it easier to target content and ads to them. Google’s profit centre comes from matching you with sophisticated advertisements.
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Emory Roane 3 Jul 18
Replying to @LucLewitanski @Google
So piggybacking on this serendipitous discussion, RSS reader of choice in 2018?
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Luc Lewitanski 3 Jul 18
From my experience, is stable, well established, and they’ve made an effort towards social integration. ’s interface is my personal favourite
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Sah Luss 4 Jul 18
For text RSS feeds, Feedly. For audio RSS feeds, Pocket Casts.
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Luc Lewitanski 4 Jul 18
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Luc Lewitanski 4 Jul 18
I’m not advocating for one podcast client over another, just pointing out it’s based on the same standard and worth protecting!
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Graham Triggs 5 Jul 18
If Google had been acting to track user actions, they would have kept Reader because they would be able to track all of your interactions within that site. People going to Feedly, etc. loses that.
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Luc Lewitanski 5 Jul 18
Google moved to promote another mode of interaction (they were big on pushing google+ to compete with Facebook at the time), which dovetailed better with their ad targeting model. Nudging news consumption habits across the web by killing reader was part of that.
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