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LSE Inequalities
The International Inequalities Institute drives integrated research and teaching on inequality at LSE. Home of for Social and Economic Equity
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘We find the diversity of our workforce to be an incredible source of power. And we look nationally at how to balance inequities, and support African American women’s leadership. Sisterhood across differences is a source of strength’:
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘I don’t think the care crisis has a market solution. Care is bigger than a product that the market can sell us. Even care home operators that I meet admit this to me.’
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘Care is an all hands on deck situation: carers, family, neighbours. That’s a good thing. We’re going to have care squads. What if we took a step back from the scarcity model and thought about the fact that we have an abundance?’
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘Is it possible to organise both paid and unpaid care work? It sometimes seems arbitrary about who gets paid and who doesn’t’: question from the floor, citing Full Surrogacy Now
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘We’re spending the summer talkjng to women about their priorities. And we’re going to train 2 million women organisers.’ on the aims of . Power isn’t just political power: there is narrative power, and economic power’.
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘We live in a really divided time in the US and for those in power, division is their core strategy. So we have to find commonalities; we found that investment in care polled strongly across ideological lines. It’s a winning issue’: on launching
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LSE Inequalities 3h
. on unveiling plans for Universal Family Care, aimed at offering a care economy solution for all: ‘We’re excited and we’re hopeful, and we’re launching a study of the proposals in Washington on Monday’.
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘Tech platforms like that match workers and clients were not designed with workers in mind. We saw we could develop our own technology to leverage tech as a social movement and we’ve just launched .’
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘Why are we content to pay people $5 an hour to take care of those we love most?’ ’Boomers and millennials have a rare opportunity to make a cultural shift & change our attitudes to care. It’s an organising challenge’
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LSE Inequalities 3h
‘We don’t know what the will be, but we do know we want humans to take care of our loved ones. Right now these jobs are completely unsustainable. There is an opportunity to make these jobs good jobs’:
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘There are many care deserts in the UK, and where there are state care homes, they can be very poor. Care workers themselves have told me they wouldn’t send a sick dog to theirs’: . ‘Private insurance is not the answer - insurers want a 50% return.’
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘In the US if you are older person & need care, you have 2 options: private long-term care, an insurance product, is very expensive - or utterly deplete your assets and get Medicaid. You have to impoverish yourself. It’s a huge driver of ’:
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘We know that a lot of care work follows colonial routes; in your book you show just how many workers are trafficked, undocumented and have no recourse to rights’: to
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘We discovered that families were struggling to find elder care and carers were on poverty wages. They can’t take care of their own families on a median salary of $15,000’:
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘As we started bringing care workers together, we asked why there were no standards. In 2010 we had our first breakthrough in New York, a bill of rights for domestic workers. It was slow; it took a 7-year campaign to achieve that, meeting by meeting.’
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘So many deep structural factors and cultural factors, and the legacy of slavery. have profoundly shaped the care industry in the US’: . ‘There is also a legacy of devaluing the work that women do’.
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘You are more than my carers; you are my friends,’: screens a short film about care, carers and the cared-for.
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LSE Inequalities 4h
‘Care really does connect us all, but it’s something we undervalue,’ says . ‘We’re about to have a huge older population, and we’ve not really planned for it.’
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LSE Inequalities 4h
Hello and welcome! , and are delighted to welcome to LSE to tell us about Caring Forward. ‘I’ve secretly always wanted to be an economist.’
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LSE Inequalities 4h
Join us, live or via Twitter for the next 75 minutes: for Social and Economic Equity & welcome organiser & labour activist Ai-jen Poo w/ , speaking on Caring Forward:the Global Care Economy & its Future
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