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London Review of Books
Europe’s leading magazine of culture and ideas, published twice a month.
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London Review of Books retweeted
James B 43m
Replying to @piercepenniless
"If the British national conversation does not often remark on the dominance of the privately educated, it is because so many of the people making that conversation do not find it remarkable."
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London Review of Books retweeted
Julian Sayarer 29m
Wrote this for the on a second win for İmamoğlu, the need for Turkish-Kurdish unity, and how Istanbul insisted on democracy.
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London Review of Books 12h
‘Maybe the public is ready to tolerate some noisy plate-smashing in the corridors of power. If nothing else, it would make a change.’ David Runciman wrote about steely women in a world of wobbly men in our previous issue, published two weeks ago:
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London Review of Books 13h
'Not only was she quite without interest in women’s political advancement, she was clearly not at all nice' Dinah Birch reads Anne Lister's diaries:
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London Review of Books retweeted
LRB Bookshop 18h
Only a few tickets left for this week's events: TUES: & Andrew O'Hagan WED: & Marina Warner Book now!
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London Review of Books retweeted
LRB Bookshop 17h
incredibly excited to announce this: our next late shopping evening, on wednesday 3rd July, combines 3 of the bookshop's strongest preoccupations: books, bees, & ITV mystery dramas
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London Review of Books 20h
‘For a time “All for nothing” became Kempowski’s motto, a bitter marker of his literary unsuccess: all that effort for so little recognition.’ Blake Morrison on Walter Kempowski:
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London Review of Books 21h
'Not only was she quite without interest in women’s political advancement, she was clearly not at all nice' Dinah Birch reads Anne Lister's diaries:
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London Review of Books retweeted
എൻ.ഡൊണാൾഡ് Jun 23
'In reality, most large wars have contained within them a violent and persistent economic conflict.'
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London Review of Books retweeted
Jenny Ellwood 🇪🇺 Jun 24
“Boris Johnson has become his own satirist: safe, above all, in the knowledge that the best way to make sure the satire aimed at you is gentle and unchallenging is to create it yourself”. Jonathan Coe in the : via
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London Review of Books 24h
Colm Tóibín will be on 15 July to discuss Elizabeth Bishop. Tickets:
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London Review of Books retweeted
Kurt Loder Jun 23
Inspiration for one of the funniest body-slam book reviews ever written:
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London Review of Books Jun 23
‘At one point an ex-boyfriend of Leslie’s is described as being so cynical that he’s circled back to sincerity, and this is the shape, or the trajectory, of the novel too.’ on ‘Early Work’ by Andrew Martin:
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London Review of Books Jun 23
‘It’s difficult to imagine Gorbachev’s ascent without Helsinki.’ Andrew Preston on the Helsinki Accords:
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London Review of Books retweeted
Jim Todd Jun 23
'Women who wanted to be rid of their husbands prayed to St Uncumber, who had beseeched God to help her avoid an arranged marriage and was blessed with a magnificent beard that sent her betrothed packing.'
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London Review of Books Jun 23
‘Andrew Martin’s “Early Work” functions simultaneously as a celebratory autofiction about literary life in the United States and an indictment of the generation that populates it.’
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London Review of Books Jun 23
‘Melville’s films feel less time-bound than most of the New Wave’s, because they make no effort to capture their era, unfolding instead in a self-enclosed, nocturnal world’ on Jean-Pierre Melville:
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London Review of Books retweeted
Alex Jun 23
I've seen a few people post this already, but if you haven't got to the latest issue in your intimidating LRB backlog then I really recommend reading this piece from (now) on the intersection of disruptive platforms, parties and UK politics.
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London Review of Books retweeted
Mary Jean Chan Jun 22
There are still some tickets left for my upcoming book launch on 5 July; am excited to share Flèche with you all ! ☀️There will be wine and cake 🍰
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London Review of Books retweeted
Talking Politics Jun 22
Start your weekend with our latest episode "The Party Splits – in 1846!" on the : historian Boyd Hilton talks with David Runciman and about what the split meant for politics then, and what the lessons might be for today's Tories →
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