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Lawrence H. Summers
Charles W. Eliot Professor and President Emeritus at Harvard. Secretary of the Treasury for President Clinton and the Director of the NEC for President Obama.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 18
Replying to @LHSummers
1.5 percent of NIH grants go to scientists under 35. Something is badly wrong. If we want creativity which we surely do this is way way off. Shame on the scientific establishment.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 18
Two threats to U.S. science
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Lawrence H. Summers May 15
Replying to @LHSummers
Establishing credibility that promises will be kept and surprises will be avoided is as or more important with adversaries as with friends. 3/3
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Lawrence H. Summers May 15
Replying to @LHSummers
Even when nations have objectives that are in conflict, it is important to seek compromise, to avoid inflammatory rhetoric and to confine rather than enlarge the areas where demands are being made. 2/3
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Lawrence H. Summers May 15
Replying to @LHSummers
A few important lesson for both sides in the US-China tariff dispute: It is risky to turn the pursuit of even vital national objectives into an existential crusade. 1/3
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Lawrence H. Summers May 15
Opinion | There’s a revealing puzzle in the China tariffs. My piece in today's
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Replying to @LHSummers
It is not just possible but essential to be strong and resolute without being imprudent and provocative.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
As Admin carries on the trade negotiations, and as the presidential campaign heats up, Americans will do well to remember that there is no greater threat to success of our nat'l enterprise over next quarter-century than mismanagement of the relationship w China.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Replying to @LHSummers
A world where relations btw U.S. and China are largely conflictual could involve a breakdown of global supply chains, a splinternet (as separate, noninteroperable internets compete around the world), greatly increased defense expenditures and conceivably even military conflict.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Replying to @LHSummers
W/ any plausible calculation of the direct impact of tariff changes on profitability or uncertainty @ profitability, it's not possible to justify the kinds of changes in mkt value we observed Monday or on many other days when there was news @ status of US-China trade negotiations
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Replying to @LHSummers
There is a revealing puzzle here. Events whose direct impact on corporate profits is a few billion dollars seem to be driving market fluctuations that change the total value of corporations by hundreds of billions of dollars.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Replying to @LHSummers
The market should not even have moved in full proportion to the change in corporate profitability associated with new tariffs.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Replying to @LHSummers
Again and again in the past year, markets have gyrated in response to the state of trade negotiations between the United States and China.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
There’s a revealing puzzle in the China tariffs. Read my column:
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Lawrence H. Summers May 14
Alice Rivlin will be sorely missed. Over the last half century there has been no greater embodiment of integrity in the economic policy sphere.
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Lawrence H. Summers retweeted
Maria Dinzeo May 13
Replying to @CourthouseNews
: We have a verdict. Stay tuned . .
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Lawrence H. Summers May 11
Replying to @LHSummers
You do not have to have a broad new theory of antitrust to be appalled by these developments. They look terrible for consumer welfare.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 11
Replying to @LHSummers
The interesting question is how much of the problem is failed enforcement of existing law and how much Is that existing law needs to be altered. I suspect the former.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 11
This article is as vivid an example as I have seen of the need for an overhaul of US antitrust. If this can be happening in shaving industry, problems may be pervasive even outside technology.
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Lawrence H. Summers May 6
No President is above the law. Secretary & shouldn’t be in the business of providing political cover for this corrupt Administration.
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