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Kristin Jinks
Research Officer in Marine Science / PhD candidate researching seagrass food webs and urban impacts on fisheries food webs
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Gretta Pecl Jun 23
This complete lack of ‘representation’ wld be appalling no matter WHAT the topic, the fact that it is maternity care they are discussing/deciding just makes it all the more incredulous.
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Project Seagrass Jun 21
We've given you 10 ways to protect seagrass but what is it about seagrass that's so important? Here's 4 reasons (out of many!) why you should care about our seagrass meadows 👇
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Dr. Vincent Raoult Jun 22
Gentle reminder: PhD students are payed less than minimum wage. Post PhD, most will work long hours for little to no money just to build their CV for a chance at a job. At equivalent qualifications, we would be earning nearly 100k. This is not right
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Fernanda Adame Jun 19
Inspirational talk by . So proud to have her as a mentor, colleague, but most of all, as a friend
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Dr Trevathan-Tackett Jun 18
Exciting to see results of long-term rehab presented by At !
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The Connolly Lab Jun 18
Excellent talk from team member who has the facts on storage and release on the @amsn2019
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Ashley Whitt Jun 18
Huge thank you to for organizing this year's 🌱 Due to your hardwork many of us ECRs and PhDs were able to make new connections and exchange ideas about and 😁 thank you!👏👏👏
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
The Connolly Lab Jun 18
Great talk from discussing the science behind valuing Australia’s blue economy
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Aus Rivers Institute Jun 18
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Vishnu Prahalad Jun 18
Paul Boon demonstrating the limitations of the traditional/linear approach to knowledge transfer in science and arguing for an increased role of advocacy by conservation scientists, , more in this special issue of
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Vishnu Prahalad Jun 18
Strong and diverse contributions from and today on at the with talks by PhD candidates John Aalders on , Violet Harrison-Day on and Inger Visby from the Derwent Estuary Program on baseline monitoring & management
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Vishnu Prahalad Jun 17
Great talk by on the role of lateral exchange/outwelling from and potentially on reducing nearshore ocean acidity to pre-industrial levels.
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Paul Carnell Jun 18
talking about the global project and talking about about historical mapping of encroachment into at
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Chris Brown Jun 17
New job in Quantitative Ecology with us at (Australia)
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Global Wetlands Project Jun 8
"We should, with great gratitude, come to know that we are fortunate for it..." shares his vision for our relationship with seas on
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Kristin Jinks Jun 4
Replying to @helenyaan
You will smash it babe! You will be amazing 😁 But I’ll miss having you around 😢
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Dr Richard Lilley Jun 2
Urgent action is needed to stem the loss of meadows across the world. What can we do to help? Fortunately, we have created a handy infographic on the 10 most successful strategies to increase seagrass resilience and help reverse their decline. 🙌🌱
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Kristin Jinks retweeted
Mischa P Turschwell May 29
Prey availability and flow conditions are related to changes in barramundi abundance. Check out our new paper to read more about why flow regulation could impact these iconic predators.
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Global Wetlands Project May 21
Halting loss requires strong for effective . Our new paper out today highlights the importance of coastal for .
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Global Wetlands Project May 21
Key finding from our review: the major groups of marine megafauna use coastal wetlands to live, breed or feed far more than previously thought. Full paper:
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