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Kassondra Cloos
Free-Range Journalist. Snail mailer. Co-founder of . Former Rhode Islander. grad. Will backpack for ice cream.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 8
I grew up in Rhode Island and am amazed that you're a fan of bakery pizza. Loved your article. But I always saw it as a utilitarian party food--the RI equivalent of bringing chips & salsa. I've always hated it. White pizza is way better! Also regular pizza, period.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
I also grumble about trails being too crowded. But I'm one of the folks who's been inspired by the internet. After that first hike, I subscribed to and ultimately changed my whole career path.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @rscottjones @kylefrost
I went on my first real mountain-summitting hike in 2012. But even still, a friend (now bf) brought me there, which was great because I had no idea what I was doing and I had no business hiking in the Sonoran desert on my own in June.
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Shannon Wianecki Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
I think about this all the time. So many places where I live in Hawaii have been trampled (or closed) that I no longer write about them. The infrastructure isn’t keeping up with the traffic
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Yep. If you build it, they will come... and you better be prepared to deal with that.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @MercuryMG
That's exactly the q I'm trying to answer. I think it's super-nuanced, because it's not just about protecting the wilderness but also about making places inclusive and accessible. I try to weave LNT principles into my stories whenever I can. Awareness of problems is a good start.
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Kyle Frost Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
Also the idea of not sharing locations because you "earned" it. Or that people should "discover" and "explore" to find places. Gimme a break. You're not Lewis and Clark.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @kylefrost
Right. Also, none of us are or ever will be the first to "discover" one of these places. Whose Land is such an awesome tool and reminder of that:
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @kylefrost
But I also get the argument that making it easier to get to these places makes it easier to destroy them. Iceland is a large-scale example of the negative impacts tourism can have on nature.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @kylefrost
Oh man, that would have been a GREAT April Fools joke. I'm torn on geo-tagging for the same reason--like, how many epic places have I been to, and truly enjoyed, because I've read about them online or seen them on Instagram, and then researched how to get there?
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(((Adam Roy))) Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
I mean, I agree. I think we need to factor in an area's fragility when we decide whether/how much to write about it, but also "secret spots" are a kind of elitism to me.
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Molly Pascal Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
I think its fair to educate visitors on how to look after such lovely spots, but unfair to think that the right way to go about it is by keeping them secret.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @adnroy
YES EXACTLY.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
OK this is more than two thoughts. And perhaps I'm going in circles a bit. But really--would love to hear folks' suggestions for solutions/advice on how you think travel/outdoor media can write about hikes, etc. in a net-positive way.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @katieboue
When you see litter all the time on the trail or at camp sites (or WHEN YOUR DOG EATS LITTERED TAMPONS), it makes you angry and it makes you want to do something about it. We need to keep people coming back, and to play the long game.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @katieboue
And the more we encourage people to go out and enjoy nature, the more easily we can teach them to protect and advocate for it. Like 's challenge to pick up trash EVERY TIME you go outside.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
2a/devil's advocate, this raises the question of keeping people safe. That's what's great about established trails (like Conundrum)--it's well-trafficked, easy entry for people who are just starting out, nearly fool-proof in terms of not getting lost/hurt.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
2. Agree 100% people should have to work to find the parts of the wilderness that are most fragile. LNT's guidelines on not geo-tagging are fantastic. Instead of step-by-step online guidelines, maybe we need more map-reading education. And word of mouth!
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
Two of my own thoughts: 1. WE NEED MORE FUNDING. We need fully-funded NPS and Forest Service programs to nip litterbugs in the bud, keep places clean to keep folks from thinking "oh, it's just one more poop bag" (ahem: ), and educate.
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Kassondra Cloos Apr 5
Replying to @KassondraCloos
Struggling to articulate all of this in tweet form! I'd love to hear your thoughts on how we balance a) protecting the wild b) showing people beautiful places that will hopefully encourage them to want to be better/LNT hikers and c) keeping places nice for folks who live there
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