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Karen Christianson
Director of Public Engagement, Newberry Library. Spreading the word: public humanities, medieval history, manuscript studies, digital humanities.
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Karen Christianson retweeted
Suzanne Karr Schmidt 14h
What says the Hellmouth on Halloween? "ENTER MY BELOVED"! I've never seen such a polite request to devour an entire sea craft, even "Lucipher's New Row-Boat" ca. 1720s England. (English Caricatures; copy of BM 1714)
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Suzanne Karr Schmidt Oct 19
Speed on over to the Newberry next Tuesday night, and I promise you'll never look at bicycles or our collection the same way again...
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Rose Miron Oct 18
One week left to apply for the 2020 NCAIS Graduate Conference at the !
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Newberry Library Oct 18
Stop by tomorrow for Open House Chicago 2019. You will not be disappointed.
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Newberry Library Oct 17
We’re a site for this Sat. Visit btwn 9am & 5pm to learn abt our history, our collection, our awesomeness, & the of the library.
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Newberry Library Oct 17
The haul from our most recent pest patrol. These traps, stationed across the library, stop critters before they can harm our collection/creep out our readers.
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Suzanne Karr Schmidt Oct 17
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Karen Christianson Oct 16
The Newberry holds 4 of the 5 original parts (each vocal part is in a separate piece of music). Blog post by Carla Zecher revealing where part book #5 - the "altus" - is:
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Jill Gage Oct 16
I would totally wear calligraphic eyeglasses. Jean de Beau-Chester (Paris, 1580).
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Karen Christianson Oct 16
Replying to @kujira871
Shades of Moby Dick!
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USTC 📖🔍 Oct 16
Continuing our series on new additions to the USTC, Arthur der Weduwen investigates the unique history of printing. This remarkable expansion was possible thanks to our diligent summer volunteer, !
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Karen Christianson Oct 16
One of my favorite collection items! Printed on parchment, with absolutely gorgeous hand-painted illuminations for the double-spread title page, plus one at the beginning of each book: Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso.
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Karen Christianson retweeted
D. Bradford Hunt Oct 15
Program on Chicago 1919: Confronting the Race Riots tonight , a terrific partner in the effort to think about the legacy of the most violent week in Chicago’s history. and on the stage with Nancy Villafranca. Great program.
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Karen Christianson Oct 15
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Karen Christianson Oct 15
Replying to @fay_hale
How about Susan McDougal in an orange jumpsuit and shackles?
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Karen Christianson Oct 15
Bought mine bookshop - keeping it in my office so you can sign it at our event next week!
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Karen Christianson retweeted
Monica H Green Oct 14
Today, for many, is . I'm late posting this, but I wanted to share some observations about the thinking I've done the past few years in developing a to 1500 course. The "1500" cut-off day was determined by the unit I was teaching in. It was ...
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Jill Gage Oct 14
I love Irene Wellington’s trials & notes for her contribution to the King Penguin Book of Scripts (1949): “The ‘g’ ...oozed” and “These all went very wrong.” Also, “I like your clear typewriting face.”
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Karen Christianson retweeted
Newberry Library Oct 14
“Wherever a person goes, they're on Native land." -- (Apsáalooke) Pictured: Starla Thompson (Potawatomi & Chumash), Nikki McDaid-Morgan (Shoshone-Bannock), Maritza Garcia (Choctaw), & Nizhoni Ward (Diné & Choctaw).
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The Pulter Project Oct 11
We are thrilled to receive Best Project in Digital Scholarship from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender! We’re grateful for every contributor, editor, and teacher who helps make us a model of innovative collaboration.
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