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John Rentoul
Evolution of the word "hundred" in Indo-European languages: diagram by
Most European languages developed from a single language called Proto-Indo-European, spoken approximately from 4500 BC and 2500 BC somewhere in the Ukrainian and Russian steppe, at least according
Jakub Marian Jakub Marian @JakubMarian
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Roland Smith 21 Aug 18
No matter how hard I look, I can't see how kantom, simta and hunda are all derivatives of one word.
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Azria 21 Aug 18
Kurdish is not a language, it is a dialect. Check what Lord Curzon said in 1924 about this specific issue.
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Jakub Marian 21 Aug 18
Replying to @rolandmcs @JohnRentoul
The "k" with an acute accent is a sort of a "soft k" in Proto-Indo-European, similar to "k" in "keen". In some languages it changed to a normal "k", which in Germanic languages changed to "kh" ("ch" in "Loch") and then to h. In Slavic languages, it became a soft "sh".
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Welcome to chaos 21 Aug 18
The number 8 is also interesting. Often associated with night/darkness
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Roland Smith 21 Aug 18
Thanks. Great site.
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Roland Smith 21 Aug 18
Thanks
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Louis Kasatkin 21 Aug 18
The term "hundred" came about after centuries of folk going around having to say ninety-nine plus one for far too long and they just began to lose interest until someone came up with the user friendly alternative.
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