Twitter | Search | |
John B. Holbein
Asst. Professor of Public Policy, Politics, & Education . Co-author of "Making Young Voters" I tweet interesting social science.
9,670
Tweets
20,893
Following
24,139
Followers
Tweets
John B. Holbein 4h
Replying to @JohnHolbein1
I try to teach my students that, as much as we hate it, the issue attention cycle is brutal and it is consistent. Problems only rarely rise for a long period of time. Protestors go home. Protesting without voting is not enough. Immediate and coordinated action is so important.
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein 4h
As if on cue: "What Happened to the Young Voters Focused on Guns?" in the
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein retweeted
UVA Batten School 16h
New piece in the American Political Science Review () today by 's , on the effects of school shootings on electoral mobilization and outcomes. Read it here!
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein 22h
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein 22h
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein retweeted
Hans Hassell Aug 4
My work with and Matthew Baldwin is out today at . In it, we explore the effects of school shootings on electoral mobilization and election outcomes. We find no effects. Nothing.
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 3
"The Twitter hive-mind seems to agree with the concept of restorative justice." "But, the whole basic premise of Twitter is that a person is either good or bad. That that designation is existential, and enduring, and forever."
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 3
Replying to @KirstenWidner
Sweet!! :)
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 3
Access to mental health services reduces crime.
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 2
Replying to @JohnHolbein1
This paper reminded me of a similar set of papers that look at whether policymakers respond when they are provided with information about where their constituents stand (see this thread).
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 2
Do policymakers update their positions when they are presented with information from experts? Yes; some do! Source: "Do Policymakers Listen To Experts? Evidence from a National Survey of Local and State Policymakers"
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein retweeted
Julian Reif Aug 2
The Brodeur, Cook, and Heyes paper on p-hacking has been published by AER: They show that the amount of p-hacking / publication bias varies by research design. Figure 2 shows their main results very clearly.
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 1
I'm not the only one who internally screams "WHAT ARE THEY DOING!?!?!?!" when I watch shows/movies made long before pandemic that have people gathering in large groups, not wearing masks, shaking hands, and high-fiving, am I?
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 1
Achievement: unlocked! I made it into a summer (book) stack!
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 1
: check it out. 1. "Bounds on treatment effects in RDDs with a manipulated running variable" 2. How Much Should We Trust RDD Estimates? 3. "RDDs with Multivalued Treatments"
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein retweeted
Lior Sheffer Jul 31
People openly discriminate against those voting for rival parties. But in a series of pre- and post-election dictator game experiments, I find that this in-group bias is cut by -a full third- just 2 days after an election. This and more, in a paper now out in
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 1
great idea!
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Aug 1
We kneel in prayer We kneel in sacraments We kneel in proposals We kneel in injuries We kneel in death We kneel in respect We kneel in solitude We kneel in unity We kneel in resolution We kneel in sadness I can’t imagine a more appropriate thing to do during a nation’s anthem.
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein Jul 30
"Using nearly two decades of election results from the state of Texas, we find evidence of voters switching party support when their party's candidate has a distinctively Hispanic name."
Reply Retweet Like
John B. Holbein retweeted
Yphtach Lelkes Jul 29
Trump's tweets attacking a brand has immediate *big* effects on polarized evaluations of that brand, although the effects dissipate after a few months. neat use of rolling cross-sectional data by Endres and Green
Reply Retweet Like