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Joanne Harris
Loves the smell of facepalm in the morning.
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Joanne Harris retweeted
Bill Madden 17h
Showing the moral courage of few politicians, Scotland's 1st Minister Nicola Sturgeon quits BBC event over the invitation of white supremacist Steve Bannon: "I will not be part of any process that risks legitimizing or normalizing far-right, racist views"
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Joanne Harris 3h
Replying to @sneezysnooze
Not yet.
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Joanne Harris 3h
Replying to @skippybe
I'm here till tonight...
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Joanne Harris 4h
Replying to @MrsHirez
I'll go looking...
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Joanne Harris 4h
And this morning the Shed is off in search of the elusive FantasyCon Hotel Breakfast...
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Joanne Harris 4h
Replying to @Twosidesofacoin
:-)
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Joanne Harris 4h
Replying to @MrsHirez
There's a hotel cat???
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Joanne Harris 4h
Replying to @Twosidesofacoin
Thank you. Not everyone is able to admit they made a mistake. Easy to do on Twitter, I know. No hard feelings.
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Joanne Harris 4h
Let me find out more.
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Joanne Harris 15h
Replying to @LesterProstop1
If it won't leave you alone, keep at it.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
10. Don't send your manuscript to an agent at the end of November. They'll already be overwhelmed by NaNoWriMo novels, most of which badly need editing....
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
9. You haven't failed if you don't have a draft by the end of the month. If it was that easy to write a book in a month, all of us would be doing it all the time.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
8. Don't stress over how fast other people are writing. You know the pace that works for you. Stick to it. It's not a competition.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
7. Do one thing at a time. If you're trying for a first draft, don't waste time trying to edit it as you go along. All first drafts are rough. Get a first draft down, and it will be easier to refine it later.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
6. Don't agonize over your word count. 300 good words are better than 3000 bad ones.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
5. It can be helpful to set aside time every day for writing, and to keep to a daily routine. It's up to you whether you give up an hour's TV; get up an hour early; work through your lunch hour. Whatever it is, when you've chosen it, stick to it.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
4. Even if all you can produce is 300 words a day, you can still do NaNoWriMo. 300 words every day for a whole month is a decent chunk of a first draft, some detailed editing, or a detailed, scene-by-scene outline.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
3. Instead, manage your expectations. Decide how much time you're able to give to NaNoWriMo every day, and whether you're going for: a detailed outline; a first draft; a rewrite; an edited version of an existing draft.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
2. The shared experience of writing during NaNoWriMo can be tremendously helpful in many ways. But don't expect to have a fully-finished, edited novel in a month.
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Joanne Harris 20h
Replying to @Joannechocolat
1. With NaNoWriMo around the corner, it's time to start thinking about what participating means to writers, and what to expect from the experience.
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