Twitter | Search | |
Jesse Stommel
Turnitin to Be Acquired by Advance Publications for $1.75B. So, that's what all that student Intellectual property is worth. How much of that $1.75B do you think is going to the students who have fed their database for years? I have a pretty good guess: zero billion.
Reply Retweet Like More
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
This is a pretty common end game for tech companies, especially ones that traffic in human data: create a large base of users, collect their data, monetize that data in ways that help assess its value, then leverage that valuation in an acquisition deal.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
What is most concerning is the specific kind of data that Turnitin has specialized in collecting: student intellectual property. And that they’ve made deals with public educational institutions, which help collect more data, while Turnitin sells access to that data back to them.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
Turnitin contributes to a culture of suspicion around student writing. They manufacture a problem and sell a solution. The Turnitin database clearly has monetary value, and contributors to that database (students) are not compensated for the use of their intellectual property.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
I'm increasingly worried about the way educational institutions engage with edtech companies. When institutions adopt a plagiarism detection tool, they’re choosing to trust a profit-driven corporation more than their own students.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
And usually more than their own composition experts, who are likely strong opponents of the use of pedagogically-flawed tools like Turnitin.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
I worry if tools like this continue to become ubiquitous, educators will just accept them as inevitable instead of furiously raising our collective eyebrows as institutions invest more and more in machines (and algorithms) and less and less in teachers and the work of teaching.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Replying to @slamteacher
Reply Retweet Like
Lisa Hinchliffe Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
I wish I could strongly concur with you on this re comp folks. Sadly ...
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Might be hit or miss, but at least the is not on board with Plagiarism Detection Services: And:
Reply Retweet Like
Dylan Medina Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer @slamteacher
A (probably half-baked) thought and question: edtech and for-profit education companies are the way the wind is blowing (as much as we might resist). Should we be teaching students about intellectual property as we teach them to produce it? Like IP literacy?
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Absolutely. The best way to use Turnitin for a writing class is as an example — of how a mega-corp gathers IP and abuses it. I think this is also a way to teach students about plagiarism and the value of authorship.
Reply Retweet Like
Dylan Medina Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer @slamteacher
Love it! I also wonder, whether it's a writing class or a coding class or whatever, if students are encouraged to think of their work as IP rather than just homework, will it change their approach to how they do the work or how we design assignments?
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 6
Love that, and yes.
Reply Retweet Like
Harry Bachrach Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer
Can you elaborate on how they manufacture the problem? I agree with you about the selling of data, but I feel like the issue of academic plagerism predates turnitin
Reply Retweet Like
Dr. 🐯Patty🦁Catty😸 Mar 6
Replying to @Jessifer @ampersine
So, I was pushed to use the Turnitin interface because Blackboard eliminated most of the commenting tools that were useful to me as a professor. I am eminently prepared to identify plagiarism. It’s a real problem, not a manufactured one. Profs are constrained by BS systems.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 7
Replying to @HarryB
They feed a culture of suspicion. Students in the aggregate are assumed to be plagiarists. Plagiarism is assumed to be necessarily bad. Which of course it isn’t: remix, homage, allusion, etc. The tool obfuscates the complexity of working with sources.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 7
Replying to @Kittywampus @ampersine
The culture of suspicion is what tools like Turnitin manufacture. Plagiarism exists, of course, but helping students understand how and when to cite their sources is the work of education, not a problem that needs to be solved.
Reply Retweet Like
Mary Mazzocco Mar 7
Replying to @Jessifer
“CREATES” a climate of suspicion? Oh you sweet summer child.
Reply Retweet Like
Jesse Stommel Mar 7
Replying to @DVCJRNAL
Weird. I pretty clearly said “contributes to...”
Reply Retweet Like