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Jeremy Sussman
Primary care doctor and health services researcher at VA Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan
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Jeremy Sussman retweeted
Benjamin Mazer 17h
The #1 most practical thing doctors can share publicly is that supplements in the US are underregulated and often don’t contain what they advertise or contain dangerous adulterants. This is, like, a fact you should know.
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Jeremy Sussman 19h
Replying to @roslandam
AMR: “Chronic disease management; patient and family engagement; Twitter’s leading Pittsburgh alligator tracker.” I love it.
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Jeremy Sussman 21h
Replying to @AlexJohnLondon
You’ve made my point well.
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Jeremy Sussman 21h
Replying to @AlexJohnLondon
The contortions Pittsburghers go through to not be midwestern would fit in cirque de soleil. (SDS are from Quebec, btw, which is ~500 miles east of Pittsburgh.)
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Jeremy Sussman retweeted
Ioana A. Cristea Jul 20
Fantastic viewpoint. "Evidence vs Consensus in Clinical Practice Guidelines" Best part the 3rd EBM principle: "Evidence can never dictate the optimal course of action, it should always be considered in the context of values and preferences".
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 19
Ann Arbor Hills is humming like it’s preparing for takeoff.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 19
Anyone got advice on a good power generator?
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Jeremy Sussman retweeted
Grace Lavery 🐬 Jul 19
one thing that is just hard about thinking is that the more one's ideas become clear to one, the more disappointing they seem. and one realizes that lots of people had them already. nothing ever beats that early moment of half-illuminated instinct, I want that forever
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Jeremy Sussman retweeted
The Lancet Jul 17
NEW Research—The clinical and cost-effectiveness of total vs partial in patients with medial compartment (TOPKAT): 5-year outcomes of a randomised controlled trial
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
Replying to @statsepi @TURB0DERP
The closely related, but more clinical equivalent is natural history of disease. People will enroll in a trial of a chronic pain treatment when their pain is bad. Then it gets better. rather than placebo/mind-body stuff, this is rttm/natural hx of chronic pain.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
I didn't mean to imply it was because of.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
That's fair.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
I regret the divisiveness of the earlier tweet. My main point is that EBM's often-simplified rules have successfully made errors like adjusting for post-baseline variables very rare in medicine. That's good!
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
I think the biggest advantage is the huge of trials and amount people care about them. Maybe docs' dependence on statisticians has given statisticians authority to help solve problems that others' haven't.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
There were a lot of non-MD statisticians who lead a lot of that stuff. Altman, obvs, & current structural advances like . And I shouldn't write divisively. But medical research has made a lot of advances in this stuff stuff that other fields could learn from.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
There's been some, I'll be gentler, negative comments about the quality of MD-lead research in these parts.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
Replying to @edwardhkennedy
This in spite of the very low methods literacy of the readership. Most people reading a poli sci journal (or psychology or basic science) have a PhD and might know better. Medical RCTs have improved in spite of the limited training of most journal readers. (h/t )
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
Replying to @JeremySussman
By creating simple rules about best practices, EBM radically improved trials in medicine. Preregistration, multiple outcomes, coherent power calculations. We're not always that bad!
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
Replying to @JeremySussman
I'm often struck by how often the "bad science" errors of other fields actually have been addressed in medicine, usually by the sometimes-condescended-to Evidence-Based Medicine structure.
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Jeremy Sussman Jul 18
Now can we stop saying MDs shouldn't be allowed to do research? (A thread).
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