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Jeremy Littau
For those who aren’t quite sure why these media layoffs keep happening, or think “it’s the internet!” or “people don’t pay to subscribe,” there’s a lot more going on. Though that is part of that. Here’s a cliffs notes version - not exhaustive but it hits the highlights:
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Daniel Thomsen Jan 24
Replying to @JeremyLittau
Jeremy, thanks for posting this thread. I earned a college credit tonight that I did not pay for.
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(((Blue Dilly Gal))) Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
Jeremy this is fascinating. So concise and clear. Brings to mind our postal service and the apparent business model of distributing junk mail- which seems utterly ridiculous and unsustainable. Environmentally terrible too.
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#TenureTrackHustle Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
Do I ever remember this! (From the aughts, tho.)
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @meredithdclark
Oh god they were still saying that even then?
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Molly Yanity Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
Jeremy, this is awesome. Well done.
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Joyce Wright Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
Well done. Do you see the same trajectory in the television industry? Specifially local and regional stations.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @profitartist
Yes, unfortunately I think we’re already seeing it. The model is the same. Newspapers operated on a model of a locked-in audience thanks to geographic constraints. Broadcast TV/radio have had the same distribution oligopoly, and that’s being destroyed by streaming.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
But it wasn’t necessary. If newspapers looked at classifieds (and obits, which they also charged through the nose for) as community service, they would have had a lot more goodwill with readers. I don’t think it was worth the extra 3-5% in profit margin for shareholders.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @chiggady
It’s one of my favorite words that journalists use a lot to describe local corruption.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
I think you’re missing my larger point. Newspapers existed because the audience was locked in. By charging for public services, they created a market for free, and those free products devastated the industry. With some cultivation and service, they still own that audience.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
It devastated the industry because it caused a panic. Newsrooms depended on that to keep stock prices up. When they lost it, they couldn’t lower profits for shareholders, so they cut newsroom resources. That was the devastation.
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Hillary Warren Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
This is the best. Needs to be turned into video a la John Oliver on Net Neutrality.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @jadviser
Whose website should I crash? I sort of want it to be Digital First Media. :)
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A Warren G Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
I get the long term trend. But I was hoping to hear a scoop about why the sudden wave of layoffs. Any hunch why such an acute illness has hit digital?
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @KellyAbbott
Just looking at some of the categories of what got cut, it looks like they’re trimming where there is a lot of competition. HuffPo cut its opinion section, for example. The problem with digital is they sometimes chase the same trend and saturation means smaller share of revenue.
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Paul Mitchell Jan 25
Replying to @JeremyLittau
Not to hate on Mizzou. (Glad I attended). ALL jschools we’re reflecting what was happening nationwide (low enrollment of POC). But colleges/universities also share in the industry demise.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @unrprofessor
Agree. I stayed out of the weeds on newsroom problems, but one thing that social media has done well is expose some of those big problems in newsroom hiring demographics. I am hopeful what we rebuild will better reflect a diverse society.
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Jeremy Littau Jan 25
Replying to @unrprofessor
(Also, hello to Reno! My second newspaper job was in Carson City)
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Grey Burkhart Jan 25
Most excellent recap and analysis. I only wish I had some (simple) way to download the threat for an easy re-read.
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