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Jeremy Crawford
No rule lets you opt to fail a save. As DM, I might allow it, assuming you aren't incapacitated or dominated.
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Stephen Fulcher 10 Mar 16
Replying to @JeremyECrawford
is there a take 10 rule in 5e?
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Steven Connor 11 Mar 16
Replying to @JeremyECrawford
I had this come into a game with Zone of Truth, to get a big group of leaders to trust each other. So handy to know.
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TheKarmikBob Sep 1
Um, what? There are many spells that reference a willing vs. unwilling targets regarding saves, such as polymorph.
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SlyFlourish Sep 1
Yep. Specific out-rules general. There is, for example, no such stipulation in Hold Person.
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Tails from the Dark Dragons Inn Sep 1
Is there a difference between "opting to fail a save" and "choosing not to resist"? Surely there doesn't need to be a rule for "I just let it happen".
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SlyFlourish Sep 1
I think, if something is forcing you to run into a pit and an ally tries casting hold person on you, you can’t simply choose to accept the hold. You’re clearly out of control. DMs can choose to handle it however they want, of course, but the rules don’t say you can accept a hold.
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Tails from the Dark Dragons Inn Sep 1
They also don't explicitly say the target must roll a saving throw for hold person. Only that it fails if they succeed one. There's nothing that says they can't choose to not resist.
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Armando Doval Sep 1
Not all effects that force a saving throw involve a conscious act of resisting, yet you roll the save anyways. For example, you might not be aware you were targeted by Charm Person. The only two saves which clearly involve a conscious effort are Dexterity and Strength.
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ThinkDM Sep 1
What about Constitution?
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Armando Doval Sep 1
Those are often involuntary too (e.g. how well your body fights off poison.) If you look at the condition rules, DEX and STR saves are the only two that you automatically fail from being unconscious, paralyzed or petrified, implying those require action on your part.
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ThinkDM Sep 1
You win. I love an explanation rooted in the core system.
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OregonPinkRose Sep 1
Here's your answer.
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Alphastream Sep 1
It’s an interesting change. I always like seeing players get creative and find reasons to cast a normally foe-focused spell on another PC.
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SlyFlourish Sep 1
I don’t think that’s how it works. Them not mentioning a rule doesn’t mean you can do that.
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Tails from the Dark Dragons Inn Sep 1
Depends on how you read it "they must succeed on a saving throw *or* /effect/" easily implies a choice. It's all ultimately situational though.
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ThinkDM Sep 2
Heat Metal suggests you can fail its Constitution save on purpose: "If a creature...takes the damage from it, the creature must succeed on a Constitution saving throw or drop the object if it can. If it doesn't drop the object..." You can pass the save and still drop. Thoughts?
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Bob Curtis Jan 23
Take 10 was replaced by Passive Checks, and does more or less the same thing if the DM chooses to use them.
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