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James Treadwell
Professor of Criminology , Crime, Violence, Prisons, Police, Politics, Drugs.
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James Treadwell 1h
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James Treadwell 1h
A grim picture, and more new groups not mentioned. showed me some worrying stuff the other day, and in a growing threat too, some seriously violent men in DBD and the Piranahs.
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James Treadwell 2h
and folk, with I make a crime podcast at where we aim to make the topics interesting and accessible. Episode 2 came out today and you can get it free here....
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James Treadwell 3h
Replying to @lexicarey @PoveyRachel
You were much calmer than I would have been Alexis. Hope your day got better.
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James Treadwell 7h
BBC Sport - Football hate crime at matches in England and Wales rose by 47% last season
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James Treadwell 7h
🔊  – a new podcast created by the ; Episode 2 released today. This explores why people believe in conspiracy theories, the consequences of believing in them, and ultimately - are they harmless or harmful?   Listen now: 
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James Treadwell 9h
Replying to @gmhales @SamuelVimes10
Yes, looking more and more like US, but also as a bigger picture, the impact of a very stark inequality precarious and neoliberalism, acceleration of consumer society and associated values that we have been drifting towards since the 1950s.
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James Treadwell 11h
Replying to @SamuelVimes10
Yes. Yes and Yes. I think you are so right. It traded off the normalisation of both cannabis and smoking (given that the vast majority of the prison population were smoking when it first hit) as well as the lack of ease of detection, but as importantly, there was no stigma.
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James Treadwell 11h
Replying to @gmhales
Understanding why that happened would be really useful, but ro my mind immediately it is significant that it was around mid 2015 that some (few) criminologists were suggesting that the Darknet might just be going mainstream. I think that is significant.
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James Treadwell 12h
Yep you are right, was bad in the noughties, but worse now, and it seems to get worse and worse all the time. I am amazed at the low value so many young people attach to themselves and others today.
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James Treadwell 12h
Replying to @NotThatBigIan
Also really pleased to see this. It sounds almost like and me.
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James Treadwell 12h
Replying to @James_Treadwell
Glad to see they say granular analysis of the problem (violence) - and a shared assessment of the drivers with good research is necessary. That sounds wonderful to a researcher who for years, with little funding, has written on changing character of violence as a central theme.
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James Treadwell 12h
Anyone reading the BBC story on Robbery rising today, this is the context, advice on making VRUs and public health approaches most effective, it's why news items on BBC feature Harvey Redgrave of CREST.
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James Treadwell 13h
Yep, had an attempt on my home recently, corresponded with the folks a few doors up having just bought a brand new Discovery and parked it on the road. Not only did the geniuses pick the wrong time, I suspect they got the wrong house to fail to break into.
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James Treadwell 13h
Replying to @SamuelVimes10
That is true too, Robbery, especially the heavy end, used to be a badge of honour, never burglary really (perhaps some commercials, which never carried the same stigma). "I have only ever done commercials" being a protest employed a lot more frequently than it was true I suspect
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James Treadwell 13h
Replying to @CliffJo08185955
Yep, so increases we see may be tip of the iceberg, and that is quite a worrying thing. Again, I can't help but feel while the code and rules were ever a little mythical (as Dick Hobbs says) the gloves have really come off in recent years.
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James Treadwell 13h
Absolutely, why I think those like have been doing excellent work, understanding the changing nature of crime. The problem in part too many criminologists, policy makers, politician's and commentators uncritical of simple crime drop narrative
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James Treadwell 14h
Replying to @CliffJo08185955
I think that is true too, they grow in sophistication quite quickly, but enter via a more violent lower end of the street drug markets and lower level street robbery rather than twoc and burglary.
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James Treadwell 15h
Replying to @CliffJo08185955
Yep, also a good point, burglary seen and uses in things like ORGS as profile of likely recidivism, reconviction and severity, but you are right to say Robbery in legislature a more serious and violent offence, so maybe we ought also ask, are offenders getting more violent?
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James Treadwell 15h
Replying to @SecuritySheep
Good point. Robbery has been fluctuating, but it also spiked before financial crisis. In contrast, burglary, (traditionally seen as linked to likely indicator of serious and lifelong criminality), largely in decline. Some of this predates financial crisis
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