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James Martin, SJ
The idea that LGBT Catholics might feel comforted by an image that suggests the Blessed Mother and Jesus love them seems not to have occurred to the authorities here. At least to me, the image looks less like a protest and more like a plea for love. "
The case has highlighted the clash in predominantly Catholic Poland between the freedom of speech and laws banning hostility against religious beliefs.
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James Martin, SJ May 8
Replying to @JamesMartinSJ
After all, the Blessed Mother and Jesus are frequently depicted in clothes, and with images, intended to help people in a certain locale, or among a certain group, to feel closer to them. A rainbow is an obvious way to try to bring them into the devotional life of LGBT people.
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James Martin, SJ May 8
Replying to @JamesMartinSJ
Now, I don't know the complicated politics behind this incident, nor the intentions behind the person who designed and used it. But the image itself is one in a long line of images that are often used to help people feel closer to Mary and Jesus.
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James Martin, SJ May 8
Replying to @JamesMartinSJ
Perhaps it was also too provocative to use a specific image, in this case Our Lady of Czestochowa, so well known by Polish Catholics. (And yes, I have a great devotion to her too, having visited her shrine in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, many times.)
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James Martin, SJ May 8
Replying to @JamesMartinSJ
But the larger question is this: Why shouldn't LGBT Catholics be able to feel close to Mary and Jesus? And why shouldn't they have art that enables them to do so, as do other groups in the church?
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James Martin, SJ May 8
Replying to @JamesMartinSJ
In short: Are Mary and Jesus only for straight people?
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