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Italian Modern Art
The Center for Italian Modern Art is a nonprofit in SoHo dedicated to the study of 20C Italian art, through an annual exhibition, fellowships, and programming
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Italian Modern Art 31m
Replying to @ItalianModArt
Today, tomorrow, and next Friday and Saturday are the final days to view our exhibition, come see these masterpieces before they leave CIMA's walls!
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Italian Modern Art 31m
Replying to @ItalianModArt
One of Morandi's friends, writer Giuseppe Raimondi described seeing this and other paintings in the artist's studio as: "They were hung on the walls of his room and seemed to expect nobody to look at them apart from the painter who had created them."
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Italian Modern Art 31m
Replying to @ItalianModArt
The vase suggests an object cut and pasted against the background– composed of a warm chalky pink field, and a grey vertical surface. A frontal viewpoint, lack of depth, and absence of shadow, with the tonal harmonies, all bear witness to his unremitting search for pure values.
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Italian Modern Art 31m
Replying to @ItalianModArt
Despite the adoption of "decomposed" and expressionistic forms, underlined by the flower-like vase that seems to open, and apparent in the fleshy treatment of the rose petals, it is the centralized composition that demands attention.
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Italian Modern Art 31m
Replying to @ItalianModArt
These Roses are among the very few paintings the artist completed in 1917, when he was called to fight in WWI and suffered severe health problems. It is the only painting to treat flowers from this crucial year.
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Italian Modern Art 31m
This week's (one of our last!) exhibition post is Giorgio Morandi's "Rose" (Roses) from 1917. Along with landscapes and still lives, flowers emerge as a subject to which Morandi continually returned.
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Italian Modern Art 1h
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Italian Modern Art 2h
Check us out in @Artsgazing :
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Italian Modern Art 2h
We are open Memorial Day weekend! Tours today and tomorrow at 11am and 2pm and open hours 1-6pm. June 1st is the last day to view Metaphysical Masterpieces !
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Pictured here: Marisa Merz, Living Sculpture, 1966 (aluminum) Aluminum. Overall displayed dimensions variable.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
Her painting and graphic work has also grown ever more elaborate, combining collage elements and diverse materials including tape, mirrors, binder clips, bottle caps, and metallic pigments.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
These were debuted in the 1980s and would become emblematic of her late work. In the last two decades, Merz’s work has grown even larger and more complex. Individual works continue to be integrated into multimedia installations of varying size and intricacy.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
In the 70s Merz’s trademark installations of humble materials–delicate copper wire, bowls of salt, knitting needles–grew more and more complex. After 1975, the artist began sculpting a series of small heads, often roughly modelled in clay and unfired.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
sculptures of rolled up blankets bound with nylon thread; a plywood swing for her daughter that joins sculptural rigor with youthful play; and a series of knitted nylon wire sculptures.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
It combined sharp, rough metal edges with soft, biomorphic contours, expanding the existing conception of a ‘mobile’ into a colossus. In the late 1960s, she created a series from non-traditional materials referencing family life and broader Italian tradition of polymaterialism:
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
Her work is as much a response to her own experience as it is to the art of her contemporaries. Merz’s earliest work, begun around 1965 in the house she shared with husband Mario Merz, is a tangle of molded aluminum hung from the ceiling.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
As the sole female protagonist of the movement and one of few Italian women to exhibit internationally, Merz’s body of work, marked by variety in scale and material, is inflected by sexual and cultural difference.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
Replying to @ItalianModArt
An avant-garde movement that rejected material wealth in favor of “poor” materials, Arte Povera identified with student movement's radicalism but proclaimed no stylistic or ideological credo except negating existing codes and limitations.
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Italian Modern Art 23h
to Marisa Merz, Italian painter, sculptor, and installation artist born Turin in 1926. Merz gained international prominence as part of the Arte Povera circle in the late 1960s.
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Italian Modern Art May 23
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