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Cooper Thomas
Nested hierarchical diagram of cities and towns in . (Is there a name for this kind of map?) Adapted from an uncredited illustration in "Архитектура Советской Киргизии," Moscow 1986. Many of the cities have since been renamed.
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Nick Allen Jan 1
Replying to @InfiniteCoop
Did you have a fun New Years?
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Cooper Thomas Jan 1
Replying to @therealnallen
I made this in 1986, pls read the description Nick
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Marcin Ciura Jan 1
Replying to @InfiniteCoop
Why are there two Frunzes? (in the centre and at 16 minutes to full hour)
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Cooper Thomas Jan 1
Replying to @mciura
There were (at least) two Frunzes in Soviet times. The, smaller one, in Batken oblast, is now known as Kadamjay. (The big one is Bishkek)
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Maarten Lambrechts Jan 2
It's a bit like ' orbital trees
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Jacob Wasilkowski Jan 2
Replying to @InfiniteCoop
Ooo, ahh. This is really cool!
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Jacob Wasilkowski Jan 2
Replying to @InfiniteCoop
What is the meaning of the next-to-last circles that also have an outer outline/circle?
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Cooper Thomas Jan 2
Replying to @JWasilGeo
Per the source, the double-circle symbols represent regional sub-centers (smaller than regional capitals, but larger than regular ol' towns or villages)
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Jacob Wasilkowski Jan 2
Replying to @InfiniteCoop
Cool, thanks for the info
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Cooper Thomas Jan 3
Replying to @InfiniteCoop
Here's the original. I can't take credit for the concept or illustration; all I did was move some labels around. The caption (on the opposite page) reads "Subordination scheme of populated urban areas of Kirghizia"
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Arno Bosse Jan 3
You’ll find similar diagrams on the GOV gazetteer I’d be interested in knowing what to call them too.. perhaps topological diagrams?
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