Twitter | Search | |
IndivisibleAlta
THREAD: On Monday night there was a highly contentious Public Safety meeting in downtown Pasadena where Community members and activists asked pointed questions and delivered statements of outrage over the beating of Christopher Ballew...
Reply Retweet Like More
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
1.) and the general ambivalence that has shown toward the problem of violence by that typically targets Black and other minority citizens.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
2.) This article gives a pretty overview of the meeting, but I want to add a few things that were left out and provide some additional context.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
3.) It may get long, so TLDR- the people of Pasadena want Police Reform and and have dragged their feet and resisted at every turn.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
4.) As the article notes, several Community members voiced their outrage that officers Lujan and Esparza are on patrol despite their atrocious actions shown in the Ballew video (TW- violence)
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @PopPasadena
5.) During the Public Comment portion of the meeting Dale Gronemeir of pointed out that Esparza was still on probation as recent lateral transfer and thus could have been immediately fired without cause.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
6.) Yet the PPD decided not to take such a simple, common-sense action.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @jperry229
7.) read the words off the City's website about it's values and mission statement of the police and pointed out all the ways that the PPD was "Not In Compliance."
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
8.) She noted a portion emphasizing that civilians would be treated with respect and reminded the Council that Ballew was ordered to "SHUT THE FUCK UP" when he asked for a badge number/name of the senior officer (while being beaten.)
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
9.) The Public Comment session on items not on the agenda ended with Reverend Michael B. Burns Sr. Rev Burns told the PS Committee that he had spoken directly with at least 5 PPD officers and they were confident that the whole Ballew incident would be "swept under the rug."
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
10.) Read that again. Slowly. "SWEPT UNDER THE RUG!" THIS is the mindset of the PPD!! After multiple killings at the hands of the PPD in only a handful of years. And now this horrible beating.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @PPDChiefSanchez
11.) After presented the report on Use of Force, there were more public comments...
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
12.) Kris Ockerhauser of CICOPP pointed out that Lexipol, the basis of PPD's Use of Force policy, was problematic in the following: • A new report by two UCLA Law professors, Lexipol, The Privatization of Police Policymaking, is the first scholarly study of Lexipol.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
• The major revelation of the study is that Lexipol’s policy focus is to protect PDs and cities from liability risk.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
• The study also reveals problems with relying on a company that is not transparent about how and from whom they get their “expert” policy information. (The Orange Co. company is composed of former police officials and police attorneys.)
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
(Lexipol cont'd) • These experts (Non profit and academic) in police policies see best practices as efforts to reduce police discretion and improve police decision making
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @ACLU_SoCal
13.) Next, an ACLU attorney from made public comment noting the numerous deficiencies in the PPD's Use of Force policy. Namely, it doesn't REQUIRE DeEscalation as the first step and make lethal force the LAST option.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
14.) Note: this is not the first time that the City has been made aware of the issues with the PPD Use of Force policy.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @mtajsar @ACLU_SoCal
15.) (also a Staff Attorney of the ) made similar points at the first City Council meeting of 2018.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @ACLU_SoCal
16.) And yet ANOTHER attorney, Melanie Ochoa, brought them up in a meeting between Community members, activists and Sanchez/Mermell just last Thursday.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
17.) City Manager Mermell has committed to meeting with a Coalition of community members to work on possible improvements to PPD's Use of Force policy and is open to hearing suggestions of reforms used by other jurisdictions if "you send them to me." Good for that.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
18.) But that raises a couple questions. FIRST- why has it taken 5 egregious acts of police violence and several years to finally get to the admission that there just might be a problem here?
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
19.) Second- why is it OUR job to do the research and present it to the City Council? Isn't this something that the PPD and City Manager should be researching on their own?
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
20.) Third- we already have!!! In August of 2013 (Kris Ockerhauser w/ ACLU Pasadena chapter) sent Sanchez and the City Council a copy of Spokane, Washington's comprehensive Use of Force Commission Report. She wrote:
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
21.) "highly recommended by Samuel Walker, leading academic on police practices, misconduct and reform. Yesterday's report on our police department's use of force is of very limited use in the Public Safety Committee's self appointed task of overseeing PPD's conduct.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
22.) ...Hopefully the Spokane Commission Report will inform the Committee of substantive considerations of oversight that should be acted upon, especially in light of the accusations and turmoil surrounding the Department in the past year."
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
23.) This was FIVE YEARS AGO!!! Why are we only now having this conversation about revising Use of Force policies?
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @ACLU @campaignZERO
24.) The city of Dallas also has had some success with police reform. Point being: This information is out there. Groups like the and are very easy to reach out to for any city that cares enough about the problem.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @IndivisibleAlta
25.) As time at the Public Safety meeting began to run out before a closed-door session, a couple other notable things happened.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @jperry229
26.) asked whether the complaints about the Christopher Ballew incident had been included in the data for the report. The answer was that the City/PPD had not received them.
Reply Retweet Like
IndivisibleAlta 8 Feb 18
Replying to @jperry229
27.) has been encouraging Community members to file formal complaints against officers Esparza and Lujan, and helping deliver those complaints to the City.
Reply Retweet Like