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Zoe Dingwall Dec 14
Replying to @Ian_Fraser
It would be useful to know the source that these statistics are based on. Interesting that there wasn’t even the slightest contraction that might reflex 2007/2008 global economic crash. 🤔
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Ian Fraser Dec 14
I don't know which data set used. If you watch the 2008-10 period in slow motion, you'll see there is a contraction is some countries.
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Zoe Dingwall Dec 14
Considering the source of the global crash stemmed from US derivatives, credit default swaps and collapse of the sub prime market in the US I find the level of US growth portrayed as questionable.
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Ian Fraser Dec 14
U.S. GDP fell by 0.3 per cent in 2008, then 2.9 per cent in 2009 before reverting to growth of around about 2 per cent. This is clearly reflected in Kash's dynamic graph.
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Ian Fraser Dec 17
Replying to @Haidernawaz99
Since you've been asking, here's dynamic graph showing GDP per capita (top ten nations) over a similar period. h/t
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Ian Fraser Dec 18
Replying to @kashthefuturist
I didn't properly credit the source of the amazing dynamic GDP graphs I posted last week. At the time, I believed it was . In fact it's @StatsWawamu. Please can you credit Wawamu Stats if referring to the graphs , and follow them too
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Ian Fraser Dec 18
Replying to @Ian_Fraser
Or better still, make a donation to Wawamu Stats via Patreon, so @StatsWawamu can keep making ranking and comparison videos
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Andrew Walker Dec 18
OK, now how about one that tracks purchasing power parity?
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Ian Fraser Dec 22
Replying to @YouTube
WATCH: top ten countries by GDP per capita, 1962-2017. Having oil and gas, and/or being a tax haven seem to help here. Dynamic graph created by @StatsWawamu (best watched on full screen)
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Ian Fraser Dec 23
Andew, @StatsWawamu have already done one. Here you go:
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