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John Carmack
The Imperial College epidemic simulation code that I helped a little on is now public: I am a strong proponent of public code for models that may influence policy, and while this is a "release" rather than a "live" depot, it is a Good Thing.
This is the COVID-19 CovidSim microsimulation model developed by the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis hosted at Imperial College, London. - mrc-ide/covid-sim
GitHub GitHub @github
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John Carmack Apr 27
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
Before the GitHub team started working on the code it was a single 15k line C file that had been worked on for a decade, and some of the functions looked like they were machine translated from Fortran. There are some tropes about academic code that have grains of truth, but \
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John Carmack Apr 27
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
it turned out that it fared a lot better going through the gauntlet of code analysis tools I hit it with than a lot of more modern code. There is something to be said for straightforward C code. Bugs were found and fixed, but generally in paths that weren't enabled or hit. \
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John Carmack Apr 27
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
Similarly, the performance scaling using OpenMP was already pretty good, and this was not the place for one of my dramatic system refactorings. Mostly, I was just a code janitor for a few weeks, but I was happy to be able to help a little.
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John Carmack Apr 27
That was my fear — what if the code turned out to be a horror show, making all the simulations questionable? I can’t vouch for the actual algorithms, but the software engineering seems fine.
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rmz May 9
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
You have no idea how happy I’m to hear that.
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The Leopard In The Basement Is A Sensible Name Apr 27
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
Is this the code that Neil Ferguson mentions here?
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John Carmack Apr 27
Replying to @tlitb
Yes
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Eivind Arvesen Apr 27
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
To confirm my understanding of the repo (it's late here in Norway): This takes no personally identifiable information as input, right?
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Geoffrey White Apr 28
That's correct - it simulates at the level of individual people, but the data about these people is synthesized from demographic data (e.g. population density information), so 'you' are not in the simulation.
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George K Apr 27
Replying to @ID_AA_Carmack
Code looks like SimCity, but for diseases
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