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How We Get To Next
A magazine of the future — because we believe the future matters now. Get in touch: hello@howwegettonext.com
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How We Get To Next May 8
Today we’re sad to announce that after five years, How We Get To Next is ceasing publication. Thank you to everyone who helped us look towards a more equitable future.
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How We Get To Next May 8
The five writers of "Disability Futures" invite us, as Rebecca Sanchez writes, “to reconsider how we relate to and with other people.”
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How We Get To Next May 7
"We ignore disabled writers at our peril," Kenny Fries writes. "As the five writers I’ve invited to write for ‘Disability Futures’ illuminate, disability is relevant to all of us, disabled and nondisabled alike."
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How We Get To Next May 7
Puerto Rico imports 85 percent of its food. As it rebuilds after Hurricane Maria, talks to the farmers, activists, and chefs who are working to change that.
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How We Get To Next May 7
"We all enter the classroom under the weight of external judgments," writes. "By honestly acknowledging my disability in the classroom, I will help students confront their own ideals—especially the ones we need to banish together."
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How We Get To Next May 7
In Germany, parents can theoretically choose which school to send their kids to—but in reality, schools are still allowed to reject children with disabilities when they think that they can’t make suitable accommodations.
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How We Get To Next May 6
"When we make exoskeletons, navigation devices, or prosthetic limbs, we are answering questions about how we relate to each other, and how we value ourselves in mind and body."
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How We Get To Next May 6
The sitcom Speechless, Rebecca Sanchez writes, depicts situations that more closely reflect the lived realities of disabled people and their families than we usually see on TV—especially issues surrounding non-normative communication .
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How We Get To Next May 6
"Disability is relevant to all of us, disabled and nondisabled alike," writes Kenny Fries. "Disability is—physically, emotionally, and technologically—in the process of redefining our lives."
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How We Get To Next May 6
"Social media can function as the support group and family that most of us don’t have, or have trouble accessing physically." Rae Rose writes about finding role models—and becoming a role model herself—in digital spaces.
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How We Get To Next May 3
"Because we generally don’t see competent disabled people in the media," writes, "most people cannot imagine how I navigate the visual challenges of my life."
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How We Get To Next May 3
"Inhabiting that shared mental space can lead to profound shifts in how we think about the relationship between self and other."
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How We Get To Next May 3
"As a dancer and choreographer, I make choices about how I present my body to the audience," writes . "I sculpt the movement of my arms, torso, and head; I make the very same choices about my wheelchair."
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How We Get To Next May 3
"I longed for a community where I wasn’t 'the first one' or 'the only one.'" writes about attending mainstream schools—and Germany's continually poor record on educating disabled students.
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How We Get To Next May 2
"Disability is not only at the forefront of technology — it is at the forefront of redefining human relationships." Kenny Fries writes about the five essays he's curated for "Disability Futures":
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How We Get To Next May 2
"A comment on a picture or a direct message starts a dialogue. This centers me — it helps me be honest about who I am, and about what I can and cannot do every day."
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How We Get To Next May 2
In "Disability Futures," writes, "But if I fight for inclusion and equal access for my disabled students, I must extend these rights to myself."
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How We Get To Next May 2
"Dance is built around the expressive capacity of the body," writes. "When disabled people dance, our use of technology and of the body changes what nondisabled people know."
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How We Get To Next May 1
"When empathy and understanding are not part of our daily life, we suffer. But social media has filled in that chasm—and it can provide a lifeline." Rae Rose on building community online—and breaking down stigma towards bipolar mothers.
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How We Get To Next May 1
"We can't think about the future — of health, of technology, of community —without centering disability, because it cuts across every other kind of experience. Disability is central to all of our lives."
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