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Todd Blankenship
llama-farming
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Todd Blankenship 1h
"Discarding cats is strictly prohibited. Kittens abandoned within Yanaka Cemetery are attacked by crows and die."
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Todd Blankenship 1h
Replying to @Herms98
Another League of Extraordinary Gentlemen connection: this movie’s based on a story by Thomas Burke, who wrote plenty of fiction set in Limehouse, the Chinatown of Victorian England. One of his characters in the teashop owner Quong Lee, who pops up in LoEG Vol.1.
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Todd Blankenship 1h
Replying to @Herms98
Oh, and they use terms for the Chinese that are…let’s just say frowned upon. Still, by 1919 standards it’s impressive that the story gets within a million miles of an interracial romance, so that’s something. Definitely my favorite of the three Griffith movies I watched.
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Todd Blankenship 1h
Broken Blossoms (1919): D.W. Griffith's tender romance between a Chinese immigrant to London and the daughter of an abusive English boxer. More progressive than Birth of a Nation (obviously) but a white guy plays the Chinese lead, who is heavily exoticized
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Todd Blankenship 6h
Replying to @EndingAuthority
I'm tempted to specifically do whatever gets the least votes
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Todd Blankenship 6h
Replying to @FNXSeraphimon
Yeah, Dai is definitely a series I think more people should know about
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Todd Blankenship 7h
Replying to @cavery210
I'd just be looking at the Japanese original rather than scanslations, but good point about Brocken Jr
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Todd Blankenship 7h
Replying to @AE_Double
Yeah, probably not
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Todd Blankenship 7h
Thinking of doing a manga read-through thread of either Kinnikuman (original series), Dragon Quest: Dai's Great Adventure, Dr. Slump, or Hoshin Engi. Thoughts?
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Todd Blankenship Mar 20
Replying to @Herms98
Hokusai of course was the great Japanese artist who painted that thing from My Hero Academia:
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Todd Blankenship Mar 20
So I went to the Sumida Hokusai Museum and was there right up to closing time. I was the last person in the gallery room, totally alone. I suddenly hear a noise, and turn around to be confronted by...frikkin' life-size animatronic Hokusai and his animatronic sister.
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Todd Blankenship Mar 20
Replying to @delenafraser
But on that note, I actually am planning to watch the biopic The Life of Emile Zola when I get to the 30s
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Todd Blankenship Mar 20
Replying to @delenafraser
I think it was an intentional nod since Zola made that phrase famous, but it's otherwise unrelated beyond the theme of accusing people of wrongdoing (Zola's J'accuse was about the Dreyfus affair and predates WWI).
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Todd Blankenship Mar 20
Replying to @Herms98
There’s a fantasy sequence at the end where the WWI dead return from their graves to confront their families for not properly honoring their sacrifice. I went through all of The Twilight Zone back in January, so I couldn’t help but think of the episode Mr. Garrity and the Graves.
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Todd Blankenship Mar 20
J’Accuse (1919): A film on the horrors of World War I, made immediately after the war ended. Pretty heavy going, but fascinating to see something made with so little remove from the actual events. The same director remade it in 1938.
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Todd Blankenship Mar 19
Replying to @MysticFatee
Yeah, she voiced the main character, Tetsuro Hoshino
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Todd Blankenship Mar 19
Replying to @bkev93
My memory's a little hazy now, but I think there might have been some music at the start. I hate to admit, but I'm not familiar enough with the series to have been able to really recognize any particular song.
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Todd Blankenship Mar 19
Replying to @Herms98
I also got a good view of the Ebisu Beer Hall giant golden pile of...uh, I mean the Flamme d'Or.
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Todd Blankenship Mar 19
More Tokyo trip stuffage: I toured the Sumida River in a water bus with a Galaxy Express 999-inspired spaceship design. It even had a recording of Nozawa and the rest of the GE 999 cast explaining riverside landmarks as the boat passed each one.
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Todd Blankenship Mar 19
Replying to @Herms98
The Sinking of the Lusitania (1918): An animated propaganda short by cartoonist and pioneering animator Winsor McCay, of Little Nemo fame. This was the first cartoon short about a serious subject, apparently because at the time animation was deemed easier than using a model ship.
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