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Henrik Joreteg
PWA developer, consultant, author, and immigrant. Architected Starbucks' PWA. Owner: My latest book:
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Henrik Joreteg 22h
Thanks for your input.
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Henrik Joreteg May 18
Replying to @katsoorakoo
Thanks, that is actually how its stated currently. I misspoke in the original tweet. Current plan is to just remove that question.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @jackyalcine
Completely unrelated, I just looked at your profile... your consulting domain is incredible! So awesome! ♥️
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @jackyalcine
Interesting. I just kind of assumed no one actually had a good handle on this stuff. I suppose a nutritionist would be the most qualified advice available. Thanks for the tip!
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
I don't feel qualified to feed myself. What we eat supposedly has a huge impact on health but we still can't even seem to agree on what's healthy and what isn't.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
I'm trying to figure out if we can get away with just not having a Sex question at all. If we *do* end up needing one, would you suggest having "Male" "Female" "Other" options?
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @ff00aa
Thanks, I'm leaning that direction too.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @ff00aa
Hi thanks for your input! So the trick is we're not scripting the conversation. We're just building the app that specifies the information that the provider has to answer. What they ask or how they ask it is out of our control.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
If the provider didn't want to ask the patient, they wouldn't necessarily have to. They could choose to check the "not pregnant" checkbox without asking.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @ThisIsMissEm
The more I think about this. I think you're right on. I really appreciate your input here, by the way.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @ThisIsMissEm
Yeah, i like that. Trick is that since we're not actually verbally asking the patient (the provider is).
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
I had the same thought, many simply wouldn't know.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @planetcohen
I think you're probably right on.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @HenrikJoreteg
Our initial approach was to have "male" and "female" buttons and if the provider selected "F" it would show the questions about ruling out pregnancy, breastfeeding, and gynecological medical history. I know we can do better, which I why I'm asking for input. Thanks in advance❤️
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @HenrikJoreteg
We also feel that this is an opportunity to help the *providers* be more sensitive. Since they're likely to ask the patient questions similar to what they're reading.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @HenrikJoreteg
For context, the provider is the one filling this out while talking to the patient. We want to be sensitive to everyone, regardless of their gender identity, while ensuring we prompt for the right questions to ensure safety of a fetus or baby that may be involved.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @HenrikJoreteg
Additionally, if the patient is breastfeeding, the milk produced after a procedure can be bad for a baby and needs to be dumped for a while. In this case we want to remind the provider to inform the patient of this to protect the baby. So... how should we handle all this?
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Replying to @HenrikJoreteg
In this particular case, physiological capabilities are what matter most. Because we're trying to rule out if the provider should ask the patient to take a pregnancy test. If a patient is pregnant, certain anesthesia procedures need to be strictly avoided.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
Dear friends I'd be grateful for your input on a sensitive topic. I'm building medical anesthesia software that asks for, among lots of other things, a gender. A big goal of the app is to help a provider ask the right questions to find out if the patient is safe to sedate.
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Henrik Joreteg May 17
I'm not sure this is still true with stencil one. It was only released a couple days ago. But it's stupid small.
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