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Hucknall Flight Test Museum
The Hucknall Flight Test Museum project is a new initiative to bring Hucknall’s remarkable, and largely secret, aviation history into the public domain.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 3
Replying to @NewarkAirMus
Thanks for the link.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 3
This deserves a re-tweet! 😍
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 3
Replying to @NewarkAirMus
Not aware of anything but it wouldn't surprise me.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 3
Interesting developments for the Hucknall site.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum retweeted
Trev Clark's Daily Aviation History Feed. 🚁 Dec 3
The prototype Westland Whirlwind in the giant Farnborough wind tunnel, during testing in 1938. A design by 'Teddy' Petter, the Whirlwind was a powerful and heavily armed fighter, but (because of other demands) was to use the (less than perfect) Rolls Royce Peregrine engine.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum retweeted
Navy Wings Dec 2
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 3
Replying to @Shirley69658426
Thanks for the info Shirley. Do you know what role Harold had in the factory and have you got any pictures of him that we can use?
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 3
At a Rolls-Royce factory in 1942, scientists at work in the laboratory. Chemical analysis is used to confirm materials testing and investigations are also carried out into electro-plating, pickling, etching and the development of oils and coolants. ©IWM D 12077
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 1
Replying to @HUFTM1916
3/3 Attached is an aerial photograph showing its location, and two views from within the factory of power plants being manufactured.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 1
Replying to @HUFTM1916
2/3 The factory took in Merlin engines (and later Griffons and various jet engines) fitted them to their engine mounts, added the various auxiliaries such as radiators, piping and pumps etc and cowled the engine for mounting on an aircraft's wing.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Dec 1
1/3 In 1941, Roy Dorey, the manager in charge at Hucknall established a factory in nearby Ilkeston to provide complete Merlin power plants for Lancaster bombers. It was set up in Tathems Mill and quickly expanded into adjacent buildings due to the importance of its war time work.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 30
A nice cut-out illustration of the Dart engine, this was published in Flight magazine in 1953.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 29
It might be best to drop a direct message via Twitter, with your details asking them to check. Their account is
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 29
Today is , we haven't got a formal shop as yet but we are selling a calendar to raise funds. It can be ordered directly from the publisher at, click the following link for sizes and price -
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 28
It's a bit blurry but this is a picture of Rolls-Royce test pilot F/L Roscoe Turner. Date unknown.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 28
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 27
An article from the Dispatch, dated 12 July 1974 - retired Rolls-Royce employees on a day trip to Skegness.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 25
Replying to @SkippyBing
And I should add turboprop development also led to the end of high powered piston engines.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum Nov 25
Replying to @SkippyBing
Yes, they did but they were soon to be superceded by jet engines.
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Hucknall Flight Test Museum retweeted
RAF Museum Nov 25
in 1940 : The first prototype of the de Havilland Mosquito, W4050, made its maiden flight from Hatfield, flown by Geoffrey de Havilland junior. It served as a ‘test bed’ and research aircraft for the following three years.
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