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Comrade Fudge
I am Bourbon Anon World's only 1932 Emu War expert Founder of the Bourbon Lantern Corps Neofudgative
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Ryan Saavedra Mar 28
WHO in January: The coronavirus is not contagious WHO in March: "The time to act was actually ... two months ago"
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
ADDENDUM: Whoops! The headstone is a police officer from the NYPD. Sorry. I'll see if I can find another.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
I used to wonder what makes people courageous. Now I understand that it's simply the ability to give yourself a context in the greater scheme of things. When you do THAT, you can't help being brave. END
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
Obviously Carpenter saw the big picture and believed in something or some THINGS bigger than himself. He's one of our unknown heroes. This may be him.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
After the war, Carpenter was one of the few combat veterans who spoke openly about his experiences. He did so cheerfully, always poking fun at himself. At every party, he became the center of attention, infuriating Orson Welles.
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Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
He was able to talk most German units into surrendering. On one of his missions, he went hand over hand under a bridge to pull out the wires on an explosive. The Germans were firing at him the whole time, but he was able to dodge the bullets by swinging.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
Carpenter always volunteered for the most dangerous missions, which he always undertook unarmed. He was 41 by then, and he said he couldn't allow any young man with his whole life ahead of him to die. The unit suffered light casualties because of Carpenter's bravery.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
As Carpenter walked alongside the army commander, he pointed out a nearby castle. "I went to a party there thrown by the duchess," he said. "A DREADFUL affair. Everybody hated each other." The army unit asked for and got Carpenter permanently attached for the duration.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
After he briefed the army commander, Carpenter volunteered again to go ashore and lead them through the minefield. I've been unable to find out if he was given his award.
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Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
The family told him where the Germans were. On his way back to the ship, Carpenter ran into two armed Italian soldiers. They pointed their rifles at him. "Now, don't be silly," Carpenter said. He walked up and disarmed them. They followed him to the ship.
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Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
When Carpenter found a minefield, he used his training as a set decorator to figure out where the mines were. He crossed the minefield without any problems. When he found a Sicilian family, he sang this to them to calm them down.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
Carpenter had vacationed in Sicily, so he knew the beaches well. The army told him they'd send a reconnaissance patrol, but Carpenter volunteered. He went ashore unarmed, saying that he hated guns because they just got people into trouble.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
So he got an age waiver, and joined the navy. Before the invasion of Sicily on July 10, 1943, Carpenter was briefed on the landings. He was a coxswain of a landing craft. He asked to speak to the army commander on the ship to tell him that there was a much safer place to land.
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Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
Welles had fought back against rumors of his sexual orientation, so he hated it when Carpenter would answer his phone and screech, "HELLO?! THIS IS THE MAID! WHAT CAN I DO FOR YOU?" Carpenter was 39 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. He was too old to serve.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Replying to @COsweda
I pieced Carpenter's story together from multiple books about Orson Welles. The story would make a great movie. Carpenter was an extremely effeminate, flamboyant man who called himself Orson Welles's maid, much to Welles's fury.
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Comrade Fudge retweeted
Carlos Osweda Mar 28
Thread Somebody said, "Millennials should give a thought to what Americans went through in World War Two." This is a good time to retell the story of Francis Carpenter, a theater actor who worked with Orson Welles. Here's the only known photo of Carpenter.
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Comrade Fudge Mar 28
Day 10 of quarantine. Things have gotten... strange.
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Comrade Fudge Mar 28
Two stalls if its empty, 1 if its busy, movie theaters after the movie are the only exception, but GOD HELP YOU if you aren’t staring straight at the wall and don’t boil your hands afterwards. Unless its a stupid fucking air dryer instead of paper towels, then do it at home.
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Comrade Fudge Mar 27
Replying to @HNIJohnMiller
Fuck it, I'm done. /end
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Comrade Fudge Mar 27
Replying to @HNIJohnMiller
This was a dry run. This was a fucking test, to see how easily we can be managed in a panic. Very easily. Next time anyone in the government wants to get anything to happen, they just have to spin up another crisis, get the media to breathlessly report, and its a blank check.
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