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Harry Fletcher-Wood
History teacher, turned education researcher, turned Associate Dean at Ambition Institute
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Harry Fletcher-Wood retweeted
Benjamin D White 17h
Replying to @HFletcherWood
*fails*...check it out here. We think the instant feedback and real example are a key benefit. In trial stage still
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Harry Fletcher-Wood retweeted
Benjamin D White 18h
Replying to @HFletcherWood
*resists urge to shoe horn compare and learn’s application to this end*
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 17h
Replying to @AKMPeterson
:)
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 17h
Replying to @jeamer2
I agree, although it was pretty carefully done (e.g. testing it with one set of questions one year, the other the next). Overall very few studies have been done looking into this (no more than a handful). But lots to support the value of models
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 18h
You asked me this before and all I could point you towards was the behavioural insights work on texting, so not really sorry! There's more evidence for the texting though
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Yes! Knowing how to adapt your existing knowledge (and being able to intuit potential gaps).
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Replying to @ewenfields
Very much inner city (USA) a few years back. They went from 90ish to around 96% in this study.
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Replying to @susiefraser22
If you change school or subject some of your expertise will no longer be relevant. But I don't think you'd ever revert to being a novice entirely, there'd just be a dip for a while...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood retweeted
Susie Fraser 20h
Spent part of today wondering if once you are established or perceived to be an 'expert' teacher, do you always remain that way or is it really possible to revert back to 'novice'? If so, what might be the reasons and how as teacher educators can we mitigate against it?
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Neat experiment finds that students prefer individual comments but learn more from seeing model answers
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Replying to @HFletcherWood
And 2) Posting students' daily attendance, not the cumulative % across the year: we can make the daily target better much quicker.
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Interesting report on one school’s attempts to increase attendance. Two things I liked: 1) Messages to students telling them ‘We missed you’...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 19h
Replying to @profesmadeinuk
Me too! And thank you for translating/interpreting it for the Spanish-speaking world :)
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
Replying to @HFletcherWood
6) A focus on student learning, collaboration, summer training and implementation meetings all seemed to help; programmes which included online learning had lower effects
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
Replying to @HFletcherWood
5) Likewise professional development combined with curricular materials was more effective - on average - than PD alone or curricular materials alone
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
Replying to @HFletcherWood
4) Nor did any specific teacher development activities make a significant difference, although the effect of combining several of them did...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
Replying to @HFletcherWood
3) The authors found no relationship between duration (number of hours contact time or length of programme in months/years) and effect
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
Sorry! (Also, summer holidays...)
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
Replying to @HFletcherWood
2) The authors identified 95 experimental/quasi-experimental studies between 1989 and 2016 and found an average effect size for professional development of 0.21
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Jun 25
1) There's lots of interest in this new meta-analysis of professional development in science and maths (ht ; $)
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