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Harry Fletcher-Wood
History teacher, turned education researcher, turned Associate Dean at the Institute for Teaching
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 10h
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 11h
Very interesting post from on what teacher-led inquiry might look like
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 12h
Useful list from of substantive concepts in history & when they might be introduced
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Harry Fletcher-Wood 12h
Why research-developed tests can't meet the highest evidence standards for evaluating programmes
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
In & with spades...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Replying to @danieltybrown
Me too. I'll get it to you later one.
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Replying to @danieltybrown
I can send you the draft this evening, although I think there's bits of it you'll hate...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
OK, I don't have an answer to this - going to have to think about it more... seems to me the 'wholes' can be hard to assess in ways you can act on. Whereas the parts are manageable (for teaching) but incomplete (for learning)...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Replying to @danieltybrown
I'll bear that in mind when we work out what next year looks like! The book's on ways of planning & ways to find out what students have learned...
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
I can see this working, but to get a broad sense of everyone's understanding I'd personally still use some kind of test
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Brilliant post from which offers a great feedback strategy & some interesting reflections on teacher education
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Replying to @danieltybrown
Please. And Loren and I are really hoping to reach you guys next year at some point. All good, just on holiday in Norwich finishing a book. How are you?
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Replying to @danieltybrown
Hi to you too! I saw Jo the other day, and we agreed we miss you!
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
If you really want to know how much students know about a given topic, I presume you're going to want some kind of formative assessment.
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
I would want to do both: integration so it makes sense & has value; short & frequent quizzes to isolate knowledge gaps (specific gaps being harder to identify from an integrated task).
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 16
Replying to @Larryferlazzo
Quite a list to be included on, thank you!
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 15
Replying to @mpershan
Brilliant, just heading out, will catch this later.
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 15
I can learn what 30 students think in 1 minute with an MCQ, or what 1 student thinks verbally. I owe it to students to get all their thoughts sometimes.
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Harry Fletcher-Wood Nov 15
In fact, if NAEP designers followed the advice in this post, the test-taking strategies you describe wouldn't work...
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