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Guildhall Library
The original Library at Guildhall was founded in the 1420s. Today, it is a major public reference library which specialises in the history of London.
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Guildhall Library 4h
Replying to @finntipp
Thank you for the help.
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Guildhall Library 4h
If you are wondering how ⁦⁩ created the images we reposted here’s their brief guide to digital colouring.
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Guildhall Library 4h
I checked 1858, there's a Davies, John architect and surveyor listed
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @CemeteryClub
These are from 1894 looks like a warehouse
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
Next Wednesday we will look at women working in the early guilds such as Brewers in the 15th century. 8/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
Women were encouraged to take on jobs that directly contributed to the war effort and their success in these roles has often cited as one of the biggest reasons women were given suffrage at the end of the war. 7/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
When World War One started the Suffragettes put a halt to their militancy campaign in order to support the war effort. To encourage patriotism, a mass demonstration was organised by the WSPU to promote women’s war work and the government contributed £2000 to organise a walk. 6/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
In 1907 she attempted a non-violent form of militancy by refusing to pay taxes. She was part of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, joined the executive committee of the National Union in 1913 and became its assistant parliamentary secretary. 5/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
She had a very practical interest in women’s work and had been influenced by the first wave of feminism. In 1914 she was awarded the Charlotte Shaw Fellowship at LSE to research women’s history. She also had an interest in women’s suffrage from the 1890s. 4/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
Alice Clark was born in 1874 and was part of the Clark’s shoe family. She had an informal apprenticeship at the company’s factory, learning directly the working of the business. In 1904 she became one of the original five life directors of Clarks. 3/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
Alice Clark’s research focused on women working in the seventeenth century. In 1900s women were no longer able to join many of the guilds, so discovering women had been able to do so in the past strengthened her views that women should have greater opportunities now. 2/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Wednesdays we are looking at our past library exhibitions. First up is our Women, Work and the City exhibition. The inspiration for this exhibition came from looking at the research that Alice Clark undertook just over a hundred years ago. 1/8
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @fabhat
It looks like it should be in the suburbs directory but I can't find anything called Upper Brockley Road. Just Brockley Road. Is it possible the name changed?
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Guildhall Library 5h
Replying to @LondonSE4
Unfortunately the 1810 directory is too early for street listings. Flicking through I found Knights & Parke Shawl manufactures at 134. If you have ancestry access might be worth flipping through the vol. Or else coming into the library when we are open again.
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Guildhall Library retweeted
MEMS Mar 31
We are thrilled to share notice of some VERY exciting news: Our Co-Director, Dr Ryan Perry , has received funding to support his research on ‘Whittington’s Gift: Reconstructing the Lost Common Library of London’s Guildhall’ 🎉🥳📖
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Guildhall Library retweeted
Philippa Smith 11h
And exciting news for today’s !
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Guildhall Library retweeted
Finn 23h
Replying to @GuildhallLib
forgot to mention this earlier, but this did make me laugh while i was colouring
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Guildhall Library 10h
Replying to @finntipp
Happy Buildings 😃
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Guildhall Library Mar 31
Replying to @ThamesGov
Here's the entry for 1875. Looks like 52 was a John Dodd, (no profession listed) but with furrier on one side and a Ladies school on the other.
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Guildhall Library Mar 31
Replying to @UKHRAdvisor
That's great! Look forward to seeing you. We do have quite a few good resources for family historians, poll books, trade directories, phone books, and the Livery Company archives. As well as free digital access to ancestry, find my past and the British Newspaper archive.
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