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Grant Museum, UCL
The Grant Museum of Zoology is home to some of the world's rarest specimens. Our new exhibition The Museum of runs until Dec 22.
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Grant Museum, UCL 52m
Indeed - have kindly lent us some beautiful fly jewellery for The Museum of exhibition, to tell that exact story!
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Grant Museum, UCL 1h
Thanks so much to Curator Anna Garnett (), who took over our account today with from Ancient Egypt.
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Grant Museum, UCL 1h
That's all from me for today! Hope you've been inspired to learn more about the fascinating animals of ancient - be sure to get along to see exhibition before December 22nd!
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Grant Museum, UCL 2h
Few of us really *like* flies, but the ancient wore fly amulets to protect against illness - they took the ability of the fly to cause disease and used it to protect themselves. Perhaps we should do the same!
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Grant Museum, UCL 3h
Ancient farmers knew very well how to take care of their cattle: this 4000-year old papyrus in is the world's oldest known text w instructions on the care of animals! (UC32036)
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Joel Fagan 4h
I'm definitely a dog person, but our feline friend is just beautiful!
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Grant Museum, UCL 4h
Belemnites were similar to squid but they didn't have tentacles. Find out more about this ancient cephalopod in Specimen of the Week
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Grant Museum, UCL 4h
Certain animals, including and , were also bred in vast numbers to be killed, mummified and presented as votive offerings to deities at their cult centres
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Grant Museum, UCL 5h
Are you a ? Ancient domesticated cats & kept them as household pets - their word for 'Cat' was 'Miu'!
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Grant Museum, UCL 6h
Ancient utilised a variety of wild animals - some were domesticated, some kept as pets, and others were considered as vermin, just as they are today. This rat trap from the town of Kahun shows us that rats and mice were not welcome there! (UC16773)
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Grant Museum, UCL 6h
Biomphalaria peifferi is one of the vectors of schistosomiasis. These were collected in Egypt in 1918
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Anna Garnett 8h
V excited to hold the keys to Twitter feed today - let's talk ancient animals!
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Grant Museum, UCL 7h
My favourite is the , & the ancient thought so too! They were revered for their nocturnal habits & connected with rebirth, due to their reappearance after hibernation. This faience cosmetic pot in dates to around 500BC (UC8991)
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Lucy R. Fisher 8h
Formaldehyde on moles and bitumen on kittens Bright copper artefacts and paws just like mittens Skulls in glass cases and beads strung on strings These are a few of my favourite things...
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Grant Museum, UCL 8h
Morning all! Anna here from ready for my takeover! To kick us off - what's your favourite animal from ancient and why?
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Grant Museum, UCL 8h
To get yourselves warmed up, why not start off with Anna's blog about the objects we have on loan from in our exhibition:
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Grant Museum, UCL 8h
TWITTER TAKEOVER! Today Curator Anna Garnett () has the keys to our account, sharing stories of Egyptian .
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BBC Wildlife Nov 18
Do you have a favourite museum specimen? We asked to choose his top 5 at :
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NERC Nov 17
Join Professor Kate Jones at the 21st Annual Grant Lecture as she explores the links and interdependencies between the our health and the health of the planet
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Grant Museum, UCL Nov 18
Thanks for the shout-out to The Museum of , BBC !
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