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Glenys Hanson
I'm a retired Silent Way teacher. Now, I use the same post-constructivist approach to create interactive on-line exercises. See:
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
Looking forward to reading the summary - lots of good resources.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
Couldn't agree more!
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
Replying to @angelos_bollas
Ah, here's a sequence I made:
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
Replying to @angelos_bollas
I worked with Real English for some time and made sequences for them. Mike Marzio has changed things around since then - he likes to make his own sequences. I really like Real English because the language is unscripted street interviews.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
i used videos a lot on online courses. (Didn't think of it as being "in class"). I made sequences of online interactive exercises - all different, on one short clip - so students would stay with video through a variety of challenges. I'll try and find an example.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
Replying to @SueAnnan
Much easier to get short video clips on a wide variety subjects these days than when I was in class.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
I seldom used videos in class (found they induce passivity) but I never thought of using them for reading comprehension? What exactly do you do, ?
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Glenys Hanson Mar 28
Replying to @naomishema
Hi Naomi and everybody. What's the subject?
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
Thanks everyone. And to think I nearly didn't come!!!
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
Yes, everybody has the right to make mistakes: students, teachers, DOS, management... Making mistakes is extremely useful - helps us progress in life. Same even goes for surgeons.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
Replying to @sandymillin
Where I worked this was not encouraged: "Don't make waves just get on & do your job. Keep the students happy. " was the management attitude.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
I'm sure it worked not because you're both "sweet" guys but because you were both mature enough to seek a win-win outcome.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
Replying to @LenoulouPan
When you push people they push back - goes nowhere. But it is possible to respect colleagues and help them feel confident in putting a toe outside their comfort zone. It's delicate to do though.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
But maybe you were helpful to them?
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
Maybe informality and the lack of rigid structure is one of the great things about mentoring.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 21
Hi everyone on . Not sure what I did years ago would be called DOS tho I did the sort of things you describe DOS doing. My title was Coordinator. Big difference: I wasn't appointed by the management & wasn't paid more than the other teachers. I was just primus inter pares
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Glenys Hanson retweeted
Alfie Kohn Mar 15
I used to assume I was a good teacher because I knew what I was talking about, I enjoyed what I was talking about, and I was a good talker. The problem was that I thought teaching was about talking and so I did way too much of it
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Glenys Hanson retweeted
Andrew Weiler Mar 14
Before you can grasp anything new, you have to let go of what you have. What do you need to let go of so you can take on ways of learning that will produce the results you are after Letting go doe not mean losing, it is allowing something new in.
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Glenys Hanson Mar 7
Thanks everybody!
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Glenys Hanson Mar 7
Two teens can be a "mass" for me if they are (metaphorically) folding their arms and (literaly) glaring at me. The message being "You're the teacher but we're not going to let you teach us anything!"
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