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Garet Bleir
Investigative Reporter/Documentary Producer/Outdoor Writer/Author| FB:GaretBleirJournalism. Instagram:GaretBleir. Please help support this reporting at ⬇️
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Garet Bleir retweeted
Newhouse Mag Dept. Jun 23
Congrats to mag alum for being recognized with an student award in excellence in digital reporting along with the other journalism fellows who produced the 2018 Carnegie-Knight project "Hate in America."
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Garet Bleir retweeted
Garet Bleir Feb 6
Latest article, "Indigenous Corn Keepers are Helping Communities Recover and Reunite with Their Traditional Foods" shared over 9,000 times, thanks for helping to share these stories!
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Garet Bleir retweeted
Garet Bleir Jun 12
1/9 🎥: Dr. Ramiro Ramirez, descendant of Matilda and Nathaniel Jackson, at the Jackson Ranch Chapel. Read the full story, “Resisting the Border Wall: In Defense of Indigenous History and an Underground Railroad Outpost” on FB at Garet Bleir journalism or
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Garet Bleir Jun 20
Find my latest article below, supported and published by Incomindios, a human rights organization that focuses on the rights of Indigenous Peoples of North, South, and Central America.
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Garet Bleir retweeted
Newhouse NOJ Dept. Jun 18
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Garet Bleir Jun 17
Replying to @GaretBleir
Read the full article, “Resisting the Border Wall: In Defense of Indigenous History and an Underground Railroad Outpost” at Intercontinental Cry, link and updates on Facebook at Garet Bleir Journalism.
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Garet Bleir Jun 17
Replying to @GaretBleir
“I will no longer let them define me. I am not a protestor. I am a water protector. I am a land defender. I am an air preserver. I am Esto’k Gna. I am a human being defending my Sacred Mother Earth. Yauno.” – Poem by Christa Mancias
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Garet Bleir Jun 17
📸: Future Chairwoman of the Carrizo/Comecrudo Nation Christa Mancias laying down tobacco on Memorial Day in prayer for the WWI, WWII, and Korean War veterans laid to rest in the Jackson Ranch Chapel Cemetery.
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
Please help to continue exposing the humanitarian and environmental devastation at the border by supporting this reporting financially:   Follow Garet Bleir Journalism on FB or on Instagram and Twitter for videos, podcasts, and article updates
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
9/9 Today, 162 years after Matilda and Nathaniel’s original journey, their descendant Dr. Ramiro Ramirez is fighting along with his family and other descendants of those laid to rest in the cemetery to protect this history and their ancestors’ remains.
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
8/9 The Jacksons’ actions to escape racial oppression and slavery is a history that holds meaning for the descendants of Matilda and Nathaniel to this day.
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
7/9...They offered the freed slaves assistance, refuge, and shelter at the Jackson Ranch–or they could continue on into Mexico. Many freed and fugitive slaves stayed behind as this outpost on the Underground Railroad to the South shepherded others into Mexico and to their freedom
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
6/9 They also invited 11 other slaves Nathaniel had freed to join the couple on their journey south. In 1857 they set off on a two-month journey in six covered wagons and upon arriving on the banks of the Rio Grande bought a plot of land...
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
5/9 In the mid-1800s, Nathaniel Jackson, the son of a wealthy plantation owner, married Matilda Hicks — a freed slave he had emancipated from his family’s plantation — and fled Alabama with her.
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
4/9 ... around 160 years ago this land served as an outpost of the Underground Railroad through which slaves in the Deep South escaped oppression by moving in the opposite direction – south into Mexico, where slavery was outlawed at the time.
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
3/9 While this area is now under scrutiny for the “crisis” at the border with individuals fleeing oppression continuing to be misrepresented by President Trump...
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
Replying to @GaretBleir
2/9Eli Jackson cemetery holds 150+ people: freed slaves, Esto’k Gna ancestors,&veterans. Under threat by border wall construction, the diverse group of ancestors has generated a broad coalition of descendants fighting to save their ancestors’ remains, history,&final resting place
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Garet Bleir Jun 12
1/9 🎥: Dr. Ramiro Ramirez, descendant of Matilda and Nathaniel Jackson, at the Jackson Ranch Chapel. Read the full story, “Resisting the Border Wall: In Defense of Indigenous History and an Underground Railroad Outpost” on FB at Garet Bleir journalism or
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Garet Bleir Jun 9
Replying to @jtbhukie
Agreed
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Garet Bleir Jun 5
Replying to @GaretBleir
Please help to continue exposing the humanitarian and environmental devastation at the border by supporting this reporting financially: Follow Garet Bleir Journalism on FB or on Instagram and Twitter for videos, podcasts, and article updates
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