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Saul Walker
Devon lad. Head Gardener House (worked for the NT, Kew and the RHS), Garden Photographer. Love the Wild Outdoors esp. Orchids, Woodlands, Trees.
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Saul Walker retweeted
Stuart Williams 18h
Red alert! Illawarra flame tree (Brachychiton acerifolius) at Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. Rainforest tree from New South Wales and Queensland
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Saul Walker Dec 8
Yep its tricky when its a big heap - a front loader for our tractor would be ace - but alas no. I've found though that the worms etc do give it a good jumble!!
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Saul Walker Dec 8
Yeah its amazing once you start getting composting material how much space it fills up!!
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Saul Walker Dec 8
Thanks Lou - have to say your pile looks quite magnificent too - favourite part of the garden!! So pleased with the result!
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Saul Walker Dec 8
Absolutely - the larger the better really - I thought I'd made ours too large - and within a month I'd filled them - to be honest I could do with a 4 heap system to be ideal!
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Saul Walker Dec 8
I call it my 'black gold'! its such nice stuff for the borders and veg garden!!
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Saul Walker Dec 8
In the whole 16 acres of garden this is my favourite corner and one of the first things a set-up when I took on the Head Gardener-ship - very pleased with how it turned out!
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Saul Walker Dec 7
It s a really great machine - from Germany - use an electric motor so is quiet enough to use all day. And it sieves are loam stacks too! Couldn't be more pleased with it!
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Saul Walker Dec 6
Replying to @HeadGardenerLC
If my arms feel like they do now after shifting just a tonne, I think 6 tonnes might permanently leave them out of order!!
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Saul Walker Dec 6
Here's a small video of our system at , as I wanted to see if this type of post works and my good friend says it's good fun doing videos (we've both talked about vlogging for years). Sorry about the quality, I've only got my mobile!
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Saul Walker Dec 6
Ha you don't want to go anywhere near my magic juice!! I also read that heat mats were needed for good germination. All sounds very tricky but quite interesting.
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Saul Walker Dec 6
Ah interesting - we used to use an enzymatic solution to break seed coat dormancy on some of the larger tropical seeds at Kew - so I suspect OJ has a similar effect. I also believe that Musa takes along time to germinate anyhow!! Thanks for the tip!
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Saul Walker Dec 6
Replying to @Devsubtropgdn
Going to try sowing them?
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Saul Walker retweeted
DevonSubtropical Dec 6
Meanwhile in the greenhouse the musa ornata has become self peeling to reveal its flesh & seeds in a rather suggestive way. The rare hedychium elatum has fully opened its flower on its 8 foot stem. Nice flowers and unusual but pleasant scent.
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Saul Walker Dec 6
It could be one of the Brachychitons either acerifolius or populneus - does it have a swollen caudex (bit at the bottom of the stem above the potting media)? I got mine from - so Graham might be able to confirm?
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Saul Walker retweeted
Robert Stacewicz Dec 5
This is a single stem of Costus vargasii, one of the ‘Spiral Gingers’. This species originates in South America. I love how the form is almost like a spiral staircase, with the leaflets ascending the stem like steps. This one was growing at the Princess …
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Saul Walker Dec 5
Oh its a wet ol' place - I moved to London for 7 years and then moved back and completely forgotten how you needed gills and fins in this part of the world!
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Saul Walker retweeted
Thomas Pickering Dec 4
A mind boggling specimen of Viola pachysoma photographed on the side of a venting volcano 🌋 made for some pretty exciting botanising today.
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Saul Walker Dec 4
Essential PPE of course - hope all is well!
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Saul Walker Dec 4
Replying to @pambizbuster
Basically they are tubers - so like all rhizatomous plants e.g. Dahlias, Gladiolus, Begonias (tuberous) the top growth all disappears to overwinter and will reappear next year - thats why if you don't dig all your spuds out you'll get some regrowing. Good luck!
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