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Paige Madison
Historian of paleoanthropology. PhD student , on a Fulbright in Indonesia studying history, science, and the story of Homo floresiensis!
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Paige Madison retweeted
The Leakey Foundation 12h
Capuchin monkeys have been making stone tools for 3,000 years. A new paper from Leakey Foundation grantee & colleagues shows the first example of long-term tool-use variation outside of the human lineage. Free-to-read link:
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Paige Madison retweeted
PaleoAnthropology+ 7h
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Paige Madison 18h
Remembering William King , the man who declared Neanderthals a new species, Homo neanderthalensis in 1864. He believed the thoughts and desires of the Neanderthal "never soared above those of a brute."
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Paige Madison 19h
Wondering what happened after we left Darwin on June 18th—disheartened and afraid that all his "originality will be smashed"? Tomorrow I'll share part II of Darwin's Worst Nightmare, 'I Will Do Anything'
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Paige Madison Jun 23
'You may think that there are other more important differences between you and an ape, such as being able to speak, & make machines, & know right from wrong, & say your prayers, and other little matters of that kind; but that is a child's fancy, my dear.'
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Paige Madison Jun 23
Replying to @ericozkan1
Right? That was a new one for me 😂
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Paige Madison Jun 23
A gorilla skull sketch, by Richard Owen from 1849. He called the creature "the most portentous and diabolical caricature of humanity that an atrabilious poet ever conceived or a naturalist ever realized."
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Paige Madison retweeted
PaleoAnthropology+ Jun 23
on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam
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Paige Madison retweeted
PaleoAnthropology+ Jun 22
Last hominin standing – charting our rise and the fall of our closest relatives via
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Paige Madison Jun 22
Replying to @PeterHargood
Yes it did stand upright. Long arms are actually a primitive character of hominins. It is only more recent species of Homo in which the arm to leg ratio has shifted--mostly through the lengthening of the legs.
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Paige Madison Jun 22
Far over the Misty Mountains cold To dungeons deep and caverns old... -JRR Tolkien
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Paige Madison retweeted
Roberto Sáez Jun 22
Skeletons of Australopithecus afarensis 'Lucy' AL 288-1 (C) vs Australopithecus sediba MH 1 (L) and MH2 (R). Image compiled by Peter Schmid courtesy of CC BY-SA 3.0
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Paige Madison retweeted
F. Marginedas Jun 21
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Paige Madison retweeted
PaleoAnthropology+ Jun 19
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Paige Madison Jun 21
Five years ago, while couch-bound after hip surgery, I logged on, uploaded of a photo of myself grinning like a goon with a Neanderthal, and started tweeting about fossils. The years since have been crazy fun and you all have taught me a ton! Thank you. 💀
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Paige Madison retweeted
F. Marginedas Jun 21
Today, I’m literally in front of the TD6.2 stratigraphic unit, where Homo antecessor was discovered. I can’t imagine how exciting this was for all the people envolved in the discovery on 8 july, 1994 💀🧡
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Paige Madison Jun 21
Replying to @egveatch
*can confirm* 😂
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Paige Madison retweeted
Paige Madison Jun 20
Look who joined us in the cave today, for ! A replica of LB1, on display at Liang Bua 🎉🎉
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Paige Madison Jun 21
The humerus (upper arm bone) of Homo floresiensis for . Despite being just over a meter tall, the hobbits had quite long arms. This bone length fits within the range of some populations of modern humans. The relative proportions of this creature are wild!
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Paige Madison retweeted
Chris Stringer Jun 21
European mandibles often assigned to Homo heidelbergensis. From top, replicas of Mauer (the type specimen), Arago 13 and Arago 2
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