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Foreign Affairs
In-depth analysis of international affairs and U.S. foreign policy since 1922. Sign up for our newsletters:
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Foreign Affairs 1h
Shinzo Abe’s political comeback in 2012 ushered in an astonishing period of stability and prosperity. Abe’s successor inherits a country whose economic and geopolitical future is far less secure, argues.
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Foreign Affairs 2h
“Perhaps the most important factor of all in determining the pandemic’s trajectory in Latin America has been political leadership, and nowhere has that been clearer than in Brazil and Mexico.”
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Foreign Affairs 3h
Unless the United States introduces a new set of lockdowns, the country can expect ever-higher rates of COVID-19 transmission until the development and distribution of an effective vaccine, and Mark Olshaker write.
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Foreign Affairs 4h
The absence of responsible national leadership and the divergent approaches of state governments has turned the pandemic into a high-stakes experiment in U.S. federalism. evaluates the country’s response:
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Foreign Affairs 4h
“The last three years are a forewarning of the intense technological competition to come. Beijing has made clear that it will adjust and respond to U.S. efforts. Washington must do likewise.”
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Foreign Affairs 5h
Asian countries affected by SARS spent the last 17 years doing the hard political work of preparing for the next crisis, Swee Kheng Khor and David Heymann write. These are important lessons, but not ones the rest of the world can apply overnight.
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Foreign Affairs 5h
The decay of the transatlantic alliance has made the U.S. weaker and the world more dangerous, David McKean and write. But there’s reason to think a new administration could work with Europe to update the partnership to meet today’s threats.
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Foreign Affairs 6h
Shinzo Abe deserves credit for his accomplishments, but the stability of his nearly eight-year term also comes down to luck, argues. His successor faces a more daunting agenda, from the economy to China to negotiating with Trump.
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Foreign Affairs 6h
If Biden is serious about transforming U.S. foreign policy, he will prioritize matters that pose an immediate threat to the safety and well-being of the American people, Andrew Bacevich writes. None of those threats will yield to a military solution.
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Foreign Affairs 7h
“In a country with a federalized public health system, states that embrace science and the advice of health experts have largely succeeded in containing the virus, while infection rates have spiraled out of control in those that do not.”
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Foreign Affairs 8h
The United States in 2020 won’t be spared the kind of massive interference campaign that Russia carried out in 2016, argues . And this time, it could be far worse.
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Foreign Affairs retweeted
Tobias Harris 11h
We've all moved on from Abe but I have a new essay for that considers the extent to which Abe's durability was due to skill vs luck and what that tells us about Suga's prospects.
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Foreign Affairs 8h
“This crisis will follow a path similar to the one the last crisis took, except worse, commensurate with the scale and scope of the collapse in global economic activity.”
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Foreign Affairs 8h
What has made Latin America the region worst affected by COVID-19? And why have some countries fared much worse than others?
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Foreign Affairs 9h
Not only did Shinzo Abe have to be good to hold office longer than any other Japanese prime minister—he had to be lucky. Abe’s successor promises continuity, but he may not have the same good fortune, writes.
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Foreign Affairs 9h
“Trump has set the course for U.S. technological competition with China. If there is a change in administration, the changes in the policy are likely to be a matter of fine-tuning.”
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Foreign Affairs 10h
The federal government has largely abdicated responsibility for the United States’ pandemic response, and in the process revealed the limits of federalism to meet national and global challenges, writes.
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Foreign Affairs 10h
Asian governments spent the 17 “peacetime” years between SARS and COVID-19 addressing the very problems that now plague other countries’ pandemic responses, Swee Kheng Khor and David Heymann write.
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Foreign Affairs 11h
Business as usual for another six to eight months—until an effective vaccine is widely available—will send current rates of COVID-19 transmission even higher, and Mark Olshaker write. What the United States needs is another lockdown.
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Foreign Affairs 11h
Wishful thinking about the capabilities of Iranian moderates or the possibility of changing the revolutionary nature of the Islamic Republic actually helps fuel the anti-American rhetoric and action of the Iranian regime, Wang Xiyue writes.
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