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Folklore Thursday
is a place to share folklore related blog posts and facts every Thursday! Founded by & .
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Folklore Thursday 11h
This week's theme is the folklore of the skies and stars! (Image: Orion, from Johann Bayer's Uranometria)
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Folklore Thursday 13h
We're having a few website issues, so please bear with us. We hope to be up and running soon :)
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Folklore Thursday 17h
Margaret Helen James: a forgotten folklorist in East Anglia by
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Folklore Thursday Jun 24
Nazis, Trolls and the Grateful Dead: Turmoil among ’s by
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Folklore Thursday Jun 23
Life in : A Portrait of My First English Teacher by ...
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Folklore Thursday Jun 22
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Folklore Thursday Jun 21
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
Thanks to all of today's amazing hosts: and ! And to everyone who makes every Thursday of the year amazing! 🎂🎉🎊
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
Thank you for having me as your last host today! For our fourth birthday the theme has been Births & Birthdays ✨ This is signing off - thanking you all for making my Thursdays great too! See you all soon 🐉 (Origin of Milky Way by Peter Rubens.1637)
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Folklore Thursday retweeted
Amanda Edmiston, Botanica Fabula Jun 20
Thank you for 4years of fabulous and all my lovely fellow guest hosts and contributors~a wee story to end my day~of auspicious birthdays when spells are woven and only churchyard nettles will right a wrong
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
Replying to @oliviasstories
thank you Olivia! We feel the same way 😊
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Folklore Thursday retweeted
Olivia Armstrong Jun 20
I love you Happy Birthday! I feel surrounded by friends in your magical world. Thank you.
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
they're really impressive! Thank you for sharing 😁
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Folklore Thursday retweeted
ennaf Jun 20
A spell cast by the Daghda caused Aengus Og (Dream Angus) to be both conceived and born on the same day, hence he is known as the archetypal youth.
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Folklore Thursday retweeted
Olivia Armstrong Jun 20
In China, a pair of trousers was hung on the bed at childbirth. It was believed that any evil spirits that were lurking about ready to enter the new-born would be fooled into going into the trousers instead. Image: (public domain) Russell Lee
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Folklore Thursday retweeted
Arienne Feyes Jun 20
The mythology of storks delivering babies may have come from various sources throughout history. The most popular version likely comes from Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale, "The Storks."
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
🤔
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
hahaha
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Folklore Thursday Jun 20
are those your illustrations? Very cool 😀
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Folklore Thursday retweeted
🖤🌑⚪️💜 Xan Larson 🍵🐇 Dralacon Jun 20
SO DIFFICULT I have so many favorites! Childhood fave is the Unicorn, also the Kirin because badass dragon unicorn creature is even more awesome! Newest fave is the Wolpertinger which is kinda the Bavarian version of the Jackalope
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