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Filippo Valsorda
“We don’t negotiate salaries” is a negotiation tactic. Always. No, your company is not an exception.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile
A tactic I don’t appreciate at all because of how unfairly it penalizes low-leverage, junior employees, and those loyal enough not to question it, but that’s negotiation for you after all. Weaponized information asymmetry.
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Sean Cassidy Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile
how do you stop people who are good at negotiating making way more than people who aren't?
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Sebastian Paul Dec 4
You should always give salary expectation, and high-ball it. It gives you the opening in the negotiation, and therefore a stronger position. What you shouldn't give, is your current or past salary. If it kills the negotiation, you wouldn't have liked to work for them anyway.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @sean_a_cassidy
Share numbers, increase transparency. Beyond that, idk, something else than capitalism.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Reasonable people disagree on that. Given the gigantic information asymmetry and high demand for talent, I recommend most candidates not speak first.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile
Listen to Aditya 👇
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile
And by the way, you should never be worried that an offer would be withdrawn if you politely negotiate. I have seen this happen *extremely* rarely, mostly to women, and anyway is a giant red flag. It suggests you probably didn’t want to work there.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile
You wish there was no negotiating so it would all be more fair? I feel you, but it’s not happening. Instead, negotiate hard, use your privilege, and then go and share numbers with your underrepresented and underpaid colleagues. […]
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @ProjAlloy
[…] Support them with management. Forward them recruiting emails so they get competing offers. Donate to . Take your higher salary and the leverage that comes with it, and use it to make things more fair.
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James Hollingshead Dec 4
Indeed. My general tactic is to toss the ball back in their court. "You know your range better than I do. What are you looking to offer" and then negotiate from there. Remember, any number *you* state will be the ceiling. Any number they state is the floor.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
👆👍
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @ProjAlloy
Oh and speaking of fairness, I wish I had a raise for every time I heard… “But I don’t need more money!” As if you could go to the company and tell them “you should pay me more, you see, I need more money”.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @ProjAlloy
Your compensation has nothing to do with how much you need. It’s about your value to the company and your negotiation leverage. Don’t need the extra money? Great! Donate it, save it, escape debt, negotiate with more leverage, pick better jobs, retire early, whatever. It’s yours.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @ProjAlloy
Finally, let’s kill the notion that you’ll have to work more if you get a raise. Not how it works. Actually, kinda the opposite. Higher comp if anything brings more organizational trust and respect, leading to less micro-management and wasted time, because you are more valued.
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @patio11
But if you made it this far, it’s time for me to hand you off to , and for you to read “Salary Negotiation: Make More Money, Be More Valued” — a 7,000 words piece which made me EASILY $20 per word over the past five years. Have fun, get paid! 👋
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Ludovic Chabant Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile
Sure I can compare the offer with other similar positions for similar profiles, but that’s still an average, so it would tell me something only if there’s a big discrepancy
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
Replying to @ludovicchabant
Assume you are, and remember that the average is dragged down by those who don’t negotiate. The company will correct you if you are wrong. Level 2 is not believing them ;)
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spongeclipper Dec 4
Replying to @FiloSottile @ProjAlloy
Agreed with everything you wrote except this last part. What kind of manager is making any such decisions based on your salary (and not your level)? If you’re negotiating to be hired at a higher title, what you say makes sense. But salary itself?
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Filippo Valsorda Dec 4
That’s fair, this one is more nuanced than the rest. It’s more relevant job over job than year over year, and has a subconscious component. But like the rest, it’s an unfortunate reality. (It’s stark and immediate if you are a consultant, though.)
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