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Benjamin Dickman Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
Is the goal 24? If so, I have a solution that begins with 8-6... I wonder what the math around distinct # of solutions looks like...
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Chris Bolognese Jul 30
Replying to @benjamindickman
Yessir. That’s the solution I found. No idea why it took so long to find. We warmed up with this at a math circle.
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Dan Finkel Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
Got it. Love these :-)
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Benjamin Dickman Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
Are you allowed to concatenate? Here, I am thinking: 68-44 = 24
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Chris Bolognese Jul 30
Replying to @benjamindickman
Clever. I think traditionally each is taken as its own digit.
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Deb Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
Kind of surprised this is a 3 dot card, though
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Heather Haney Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
I have never seen this before. What is it?
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Kim Yoak Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
Do we allow exponents? I got it that way...
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Ruth Wilson Jul 30
24
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Ruth Wilson Jul 30
One of my all time favorite games. My students have asked to play it during indoor recess...that and Prime Climb!
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Heather Haney Jul 30
Replying to @qawilson @EulersNephew
Are there more cards? And the object is to make 24? Can you use any operation? Are there any specific rules?
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Teun Spaans Jul 30
Replying to @EulersNephew
If the aim is to make 24, what about 48/(6-4)?
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Mary Gambrel Jul 31
Replying to @EulersNephew
I'm surprised its a three dot also. I got (8+4)(6 - 4)
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Chris Bolognese Jul 31
Replying to @TeunSpaans
I don’t think concatenation of digits is allowed.
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Chris Bolognese Jul 31
Replying to @dbarnum11
It would be interesting to try to create a metric for determining difficulty. What makes one set harder than another?
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Deb Jul 31
Replying to @EulersNephew @24game
Not totally sure, but I think it’s based on # or steps/operations to get to 24... are there official metrics?
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Robert Sun Aug 1
Difficulty level was determined by examining the patterns: 3x8, 4x6 are the most common, 35 - 11 more obscure. Also the number of different ways to make 24 for each combination was considered. Finally each workable combination was tested with large and varying groups of people...
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Robert Sun Aug 1
The time it took for each person to solve was recorded. The combination 8, 6. 4, 4 was rated a 3 Dot card because many people did not see the solution (12 x 2) quickly. Like Chris it took 20 min :) There is another 3 Dot card where you can just add all four numbers to get 24!
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