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Erik Loomis
Historian. Occasionally compared to Philip Marlowe. Wrote A History of America in Ten Strikes. Oregonian. Expect typos. Blogs
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Erik Loomis 7m
Someday, assuming my field still exists, there’s going to be a heck of a book on why Democratic leadership responded to the rise of fascism so pathetically
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Erik Loomis 8m
As someone who lived in Knoxville from 1997-00 and was there when Tennessee won the title, it is utterly astounding just how bad the football team has become
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Erik Loomis retweeted
Scott Shapiro Sep 20
To all graduate students who feel bad asking their professors for letters of recommendation: Not only is writing letters their job, they had to ask their professors and mentors many times to write letters for them. That's how they got their jobs.
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Erik Loomis 2h
Michigan has looked vastly overrated all year, but I can't as say I expected them to completely roll over at Wisconsin.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Going all the way back to 1980 for my next history book:
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Erik Loomis 3h
I am very interested in how people use the past to make arguments about the present. This is a good book on how the Boston black community used the American Revolution to fight against slavery in pre-Civil War years. Glad I read it.
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Erik Loomis retweeted
Virginia Scharff (LA) 3h
Annette Kolodny is gone. Her THE LAND BEFORE HER and THE LAY OF THE LAND set the terms of discussion in Western literary studies for years to come, still matter. Rest in Power, sister.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @JoannaDeLaune
Nor me........
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @JoannaDeLaune
Yes. And I also think there is a youthful aspect to all of this. It's not as if 21 year old new activists coming across with 100% self-certainty and attacking any who deviates from their current position is something invented by Twitter.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @jkfecke
Congrats on your recovery
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
Politics without self-doubt and self-reflection is just one-upping each other and targeting others for a lack of purity. Which very much explains a lot of lefty Twitter, at the very least.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Seems to me the first rule of all politics, but definitely lefty politics, is that if you fully believe you are 100% right, you are almost certainly a counterproductive force and are probably wrong about lots of things.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
Back tomorrow for a discussion of Operation Dixie.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
This thread relied on Melvyn Dubofsky’s classic We Shall Be All: A History of the Industrial Workers of the World, still by far the best IWW history.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
DeLeon went on to bitterly attack the IWW, especially for the “slum proletariat” that had taken over the convention and removed him. He died in 1914, failing in his effort to become Lenin.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
First there was the Spokane Free Speech Fight and then decade of worker empowerment, strikes, and challenging the timber industry, police, and political leadership of the Pacific Northwest until they were crushed in a maelstrom of violence during and after World War I.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
The Overalls Brigade would return to the Northwest and bring their radical direct action to the workers of the Northwest
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
The IWW was still not a stable organization after the 1908 convention, but it had eliminated the internal divide that would prevent it from moving forward with organizing workers and fighting class warfare.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
The only thing that both union federations could agree on was that the state was worthless for guaranteeing anything for workers.
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Erik Loomis 3h
Replying to @ErikLoomis
Like the AFL, their diehard enemy, the IWW would refuse to play in politics, believing the state to be a class war enemy of workers’ rights. This demonstrates the sheer hopelessness that workers had for state action during the Gilded Age.
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