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Eric Topol
Chronicity after "recovery" is woefully understudied, but frequent 1. A report from Israel of half of patients via 2. report today that ~33% of outpatients were not back to baseline 2-3 weeks later
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Dr. Ali Tinazli Jun 30
Reminds me of mononucleosis caused by EBV.
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Dr. Thomas Wilckens Jun 30
Has any disease in the history of medicine ever attracted that massive diagnostics overkill; i.e. even those challenging leading to overdiagnosis, apparently can't resist to throw any thinkable test on with shaky conclusions in lack of a precedent
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kevin russell Jul 1
What an odd comment.
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Rafael Osswald Jun 30
Dr. David Putrino from Mt. Sinai in NYC says the average is about 70 days
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Rafael Osswald Jun 30
50% of UK doctors come back after 8 to 10 weeks...
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ME/CFS News Jun 30
It's not just covid19. Chronic fatigue syndrome is often triggered by infections and resembles what these patients are describing (with a few differences like lung issues). It's woefully understudied and had it been studied more, we might know why some patients don't recover.
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ME/CFS News Jun 30
One mistake in handling this pandemic was the narrative that only older people were at high risk. The younger people might not develop a severe infection but their risk for CFS-like sequelae is much higher. These sequelae should have been predicted.
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Rafael Osswald Jun 30
Here you find much more reports and information.
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ASTS72 Jun 30
Danke.
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Rafael Osswald Jun 30
This is my guess. A very strong anaemia (virus entering red blood cells, can't be seen with standard tests) and virus persistence over a long period. Antibodies are used up to neutralize de-cloaking virus, t-cells do the rest...
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