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Englicious
Free English grammar and language resources from UCL. For CPD/INSET: and Tweets by Prof. Bas Aarts & Ian Cushing.
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Englicious retweeted
Geoff Barton 18h
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Englicious 6h
People like are poisoning our society. This will be especially true if Brexit ever happens.
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Judith Buchanan Jun 24
Please RT! 4 special free talks as part of York's in beautiful : , & . 's Emma Smith on in historic King's Manor this Friday!
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Englicious retweeted
Oliver Kamm 7h
Indeed. Prof Mellanby, who says “these sentences contain no grammar”, doesn’t know much about grammar. Of course they have grammar. Teachers should (and do) explain to children when informal registers & non-Standard usages are appropriate & when they’re not.
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Englicious Jun 23
Hear, hear!
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Englicious Jun 22
Replying to @13lovebats
It was spotted by a friend in the window of Foyles in London.
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Englicious Jun 21
What do you think?
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Englicious retweeted
Barbara Bleiman Jun 20
Replying to @BarbaraBleiman
In response to my own tweet,'ditch the grammar' isn't a great headline though! You can teach storytelling & explore choices of grammar in own writing along with narrative arc, dialogue etc. e.g. what if you changed tenses, repeated the sentence structure? What diff would it make?
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Sussex Uni News Jun 21
Don't miss tonight at 10pm where Prof. will be talking about the word 'nice'!
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Englicious Jun 21
Only two weeks away! Book now. With: Charlotte Brewer, , David Denison, Ingrid Tieken, , + a panel discussion w/John Mullan. Book now:
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Englicious Jun 21
Love Island is a lesson in how language, like, evolves | David Shariatmadari
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Growth in Grammar Jun 20
Highly recommend this book, along with the free resources. Very good for getting your head around the often frustrating FORM/FUNCTION distinction. And, yeah, fine was calling it an adverbial. So, "to Tom": FORM = Preposition Phrase FUNCTION = Adverbial
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Englicious Jun 20
The curse of Jeremy Hunt: why his name is hard to say. A linguist explains.
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English VoiceBank Jun 17
Lots of sound recordings show evidence of LIKE as a discourse marker/filler/focusing device and quotative both in established regional dialects (e.g. Geordie, Brummy) and present-day teenage discourse Let's not park LIKE outside the classroom, let's parse it! 1/2
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Englicious Jun 17
Language wars: the 19 greatest linguistic spats of all time
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Englicious Jun 17
NQT or trainee teacher for 2019-20? We're here to help with grammatical subject knowledge and grammar pedagogy! Resources (; ) and courses ().
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Englicious Jun 17
How about not encouraging the 'banning' or 'policing' of language, but instead talking to people about what language is, how language works, and appreciating language diversity in all of its rich and wonderful ways?
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FIPLV Jun 16
Korean language speakers should take pride in Konglish – it's another wonderful example of linguistic diversity via
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Englicious Jun 17
The final Teaching English Grammar in Context course for this year (and perhaps ever!) runs on the 16 July. Hundreds have teachers have learnt about critical-creative strategies and principles for embedding grammar into teaching. A few places left!
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The York English Language Toolkit Jun 5
Our FREE CPD day for teachers of A-Level English Language at on July 5th has a talk by plus classroom materials on what we can learn about language change from place-names in the Wirral. Click here for more info and to register:
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