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Embedding Conquest Team
How do we explain the success of the muslim empire? Embedding Conquest (EmCo) looks to understand the social fabric that held it together. ERC H2020
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Embedding Conquest Team 10h
Replying to @Papyrus_Stories
Not completly free, but check this out:
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Embedding Conquest Team 12h
You can can purchase any electronic books your library has as a print-on-demand paperback copy for $25/€25!
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Embedding Conquest Team retweeted
Christian Sahner Jan 20
1/ dominates today, but it wasn't always this way. Thoughts on the relationship between two neighbors in Late Antiquity and the Early Islamic period: The Sasanians were the last great Persian empire (224-661). They originated in Iran, but ruled from Iraq
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 22
Jack Tannous when he was a student organizer for Peter Brown’s seminar: “Peter, I got too much food for the coffee break so that the grad students could take stuff home”. Peter Brown: “Good. Good Late Roman thinking.”
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 22
Replying to @EmCoteam
From Jack Tannous' book (p. 436) thinking about what the "Simple Believers" in society are interested in, and what theological niceties are only for the intelligentsia.
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 22
Al-Jāḥiẓ: If one stands in the market place “and discusses grammar… only specialists will gather... But say so much as a word about predestination… or whether God created unbelief, and there will be no fool… who will not stop and argue.”
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 21
Hearing about "The Making of the Medieval Middle-East: Religion, Society, and Simple Believers" straight from the authority! takes us through social and religious interactions
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 21
Replying to @EmCoteam
"I did many bad things to her and I treated her in all the ways that women can't bear, but no bad words occurred between me and her, nor between me and her family."
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 21
Replying to @EmCoteam
The members of the communities sent in many questions on marital troubles for the imam to resolve. These questions and responsa make us think about the role the imami institutions played in people's daily lives.
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 21
Heads and minds bent over responsa letters from the Shiʿi imams. We're making work during his visit to !
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Embedding Conquest Team retweeted
Marina Rustow Jan 14
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 20
Replying to @EmCoteam
Twelfth century Coptic letter, from a bishop to a village in the Fayyum in Egypt: villagers had been plucking plants from Church property, and it apparently put the bishop in quite a mood.
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 20
"May the curses of Judas be upon his house, and his house be as that of Judas himself, may the curses of the Apocalypse be upon his house!"
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 16
Replying to @HassanBouali2
Great! thank you very much!
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 16
Replying to @HassanBouali2
Thanks! do you have the specific reference by any chance?
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 16
Replying to @EmCoteam
and was able to get a hold of him right when he boarded a boat in Tihamah. She returned with him to Mecca, where 'Ikrimah is said to convert to Islam in front of Muhammad.
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 16
Replying to @EmCoteam
Al-Tabari tells us that after the conquest of Mecca in 630CE, 'Ikrimah b. Abu Jahl ran away to Yemen, fearing for his life. His wife Umm Hakim bt. al-Harith b. Hisham, described as a clever woman, spoke to Muhammad and achieved amān for 'Ikrimah. She went to find her husband>>
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 16
Replying to @EmCoteam
Al- Hajjaj arrest 'Abdallah b. Faḍala. His wife then goes out and talks with the caliph's (unnamed) wife, asking her to intercede and help her husband. The caliph's wife then asked him to grant amān to 'Abdallah b. Faḍala and he does so. This reminded me of another account>>
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Embedding Conquest Team Jan 16
Could women save their husbands' life in early Islam? Reading Baladhuri's section on the aftermath of ibn al-Jarud’s unsuccessful rebellion, we learned that some rebels seek amān (safe-conduct) from the caliph 'Abd al Malik. in one case, the wife of a rebel saved her husband>
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Sabine Schmidtke Jan 13
Historicizing the Shiʿi hadith Corpus (Leiden, 24-26 June, 2020) Convenors: Hassan Ansari, Edmund Hayes, Gurdofarid Miskinzoda, Abstract deadline: 1/31/2020
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