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RASC Edmonton Centre
Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Edmonton Centre. Promoting public awareness in astronomy, including local meetings & events. Most tweets by
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RASC Edmonton Centre retweeted
Darlene Tanner Jun 25
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
Me too. Especially after a quarter century of avidly observing both phenomena. To find they were connected was a splendid thing
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
I long had noticed the altitude commonly cited for meteors was similar to that of NLC (80-85 km) but the physical connection was unexpected
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
I () was thrilled to learn of the connection as I have avidly observed both NLC & meteors since the late '80s.
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
That connection was just made in recent years (note: 2012 date of linked article)
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RASC Edmonton Centre retweeted
Jeff Wallace 🇨🇦 Jun 25
Noctilucent clouds low off horizon, Sturgeon Co. Alberta 1:01am MT
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
Did you know that the nucleating agent of NLC particles is meteor dust? Some cool science in the high atmosphere.
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
/ The clouds themselves are in the upper mesosphere, 80-85 km up. High enough to catch sunlight & also be seen from Earth's night side
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
Technically can be seen when Sun is 6 to 16 degrees below horizon, which indeed it is all night long near the solstice at our latitude
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
The meteor is the third. Call it the Meet-up in the Mesosphere. 😁 Just a fabulous shot.
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
...Meaning you're doing well to catch at all at that hour. They're potentially a lot higher at, say midnight or 03:00.
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
1:35 is almost exactly local midnight where Sun reaches lowest point,directly below N horizon.But only 13 degrees below at this time of year
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
& here's a superb still from of that same aurora/NLC combo with bonus meteor! We have some talented photographers in these parts
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 25
Aurora *and* noctilucent cloud in one superb short video by . While aurora dances above, NLC along N horizon evolve more subtly.
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 21
2 months from now, at 11:35 MDT on August 21, will experience maximum solar eclipse, with some 75% of the Sun's diameter obscured.
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RASC Edmonton Centre retweeted
SPACE.com Jun 21
Tune in to 's webcasts on the , starting today at 1pm ET
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RASC Edmonton Centre retweeted
RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 20
Summer Solstice occurs today Jun 20 in at 22:24 MDT. Sun will have just set after 17 hr 2 min 40 sec of daylight, "longest day" of 2017
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 20
Replying to @EdmontonRASC
4/4. The annual cycle of daylight in is represented by light blue area of this splendid graph,courtesy
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 20
Replying to @EdmontonRASC
3/ Tomorrow's daylight will be "just" 17h 2m 39s, ONE SECOND less than today. Daylight decreases thereafter, Very gradually at first.
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RASC Edmonton Centre Jun 20
Replying to @EdmontonRASC
2/ June 21 is widely ID'd as Summer Solstice, but such seasonal markers creep a few hours a year, & get (largely) corrected every Leap Year.
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