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E/V Nautilus
Explore the ocean LIVE with Dr. Robert Ballard and the Corps of Exploration. Official account of ⛴. Watch the live stream and send us questions ⬇️!
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E/V Nautilus Dec 9
Are you the next member of the E/V Nautilus team? Applications now open to join us at sea in 2020. 📝 Fellowship: informal/formal educators, writers, artists 🔬Science & Engineering Internship Program: community college, undergrad, grad students
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E/V Nautilus Dec 9
Seafloor mapping is a key component of Nautilus exploration. Check out how our data is used in the Beyond Hydrography poster session convened by our Chief Scientist Dr. Nicole Raineault. Moscone South Poster Hall OS13C from 1:40-6:00 today:
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E/V Nautilus Dec 9
Want to sail on E/V Nautilus in 2020? We’re at to chat about our at-sea science/engineering internships and educator fellowships! Stop by Moscone South Poster Hall #926 from 1:40-6 today to learn more about outreach with and .
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E/V Nautilus Dec 9
Curious how researchers use Nautilus data? Stop by these presentations this week to meet some of our Corps of Exploration who will highlight , submarine volcanology, ocean worlds, and our at-sea internship and programs!
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Dr. Roxanne Beinart Dec 6
Two Alviniconcha hydrothermal vent snails collected by at the Vailulu seamount in and provided by . this discovery represents an eastward expansion of the known range for this group and is very exciting. We will be genotyping to ID species.
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E/V Nautilus Dec 6
From to , our team will be sharing some our latest findings next week at . Stop by our sessions to learn more about our research opportunities and at-sea programs, and check out these -related presentations from our Corps of Exploration!
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Marine Geological Samples Laboratory- URI Nov 21
We've got some beautiful rocks from this year's field season - check out this intensely weathered lava with its hyaloclastite layer and thick ferromanganese crust! This one came to us from Dragon's Back Seamount in the Pacific.
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Oceana Nov 19
MESMERIZING: This graceful creature was spotted at 5,450 feet deep! Footage via
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Oceana Nov 15
Leftovers or parasite? This ghost fish has something, but we're not sure what it is! Footage via
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E/V Nautilus Nov 13
"Behold, a glimpse of life after death. The skeleton— believed to be a type of baleen whale — was being devoured by eelpouts, octopuses, and polychaete worms." More on our whale fall find with last month!
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MBARI Nov 9
Deep Sea Octopus Gardens Intrigue Scientists:
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Oceana Nov 10
The deepstaria isn't like other jellies. Watch as it expands its bell! 🔔 Footage via
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E/V Nautilus Nov 8
Take to the next level. Apply to join our scientists, technologists, engineers, and expedition team aboard E/V Nautilus next year! Learn more about opportunities for students and educators to sail with us in 2020:
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NOAA's Monterey Bay NMS Oct 31
Let the ghoul times roll! Snailfishes are one of the many benthic fish families commonly seen at depths in . This one was spotted during our recent expedition to Davidson Seamount aboard the . 🐌
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E/V Nautilus Oct 31
Dying to know more about the mouthless, gutless, acid-oozing, bone-eating Osedax worms seen covering the whale skeleton we discovered with ? This science comic digs into the bones of the matter, just in time for :
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E/V Nautilus Oct 31
The darkest depths of the world’s oceans are home to some of the most bizarrely creepy features and creatures on this planet. From gurgling vents to dead whale skeletons, here are some of the spookiest moments of our 2019 season. (Have your nightlight ready!) 👻
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E/V Nautilus Oct 30
never fails to bring the spooky, like this ghostly Deepstaria jelly. A bright red isopod can be seen living inside of its bell, literally feeding our body-snatching nightmares. 👀790m, Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument
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E/V Nautilus Oct 29
If you’re still searching for a Halloween costume then look no further. Take inspo from one of the ocean’s freakiest scavengers, the Pacific hagfish. These primitive fish are famous for a defensive slime that can suffocate would-be predators!
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Oceana Oct 27
Check out the eyes on this stubby squid! 👀 Footage via
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American Geophysical Union, at #AGU19! Oct 27
This week's staff spooky reading picks! We all fell for the whale fall. “Hanging out with bone-eating worms has never been so fun!” and more from .
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