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Meghan Herbst
ultrasound enthusiast, patient advocate, educator
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Meghan Herbst 7h
Replying to @EUSmkh
An 18yo female presents with vaginal bleeding. What is your diagnosis?
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Meghan Herbst 7h
An 18yo female presents with vaginal bleeding. What is your diagnosis?
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Meghan Herbst 7h
Replying to @EUSmkh
Resolution: Surgery for this SBO, diagnosed with high sensitivity & specificity using 1) plicae circulares (indicates structure is small bowel), 2) dilation of >2.5cm, and 3) alternating peristalsis. Additional imaging such as CT scanning can be ordered by the surgery service.
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Meghan Herbst Aug 13
Replying to @EUSmkh
This 28yo female with history of Crohn's disease presents with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, which she reports getting about every 6 months for the past 5 years, but "this is worse". Here is her ultrasound. Which service do you consult?
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Meghan Herbst Aug 13
This 28yo female with history of Crohn's disease presents with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, which she reports getting about every 6 months for the past 5 years, but "this is worse". Here is her ultrasound. Which service do you consult?
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Meghan Herbst Aug 13
Replying to @EUSmkh
Here is an example of appendicitis:
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Meghan Herbst Aug 13
Replying to @EUSmkh
Resolution: Diverticulitis. Quickly diagnosed with the Butterfly iQ at the bedside. Appendicitis (next clip) tends to be more fluid filled, and if a fecalith is present (30% of the time), it casts a true shadow (not a dirty shadow like the air in this diverticulitis).
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Meghan Herbst Aug 6
Replying to @EUSmkh
Which diagnosis does this clip demonstrate?
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Meghan Herbst Aug 6
Which diagnosis does this clip demonstrate?
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Meghan Herbst Aug 6
Replying to @EUSmkh
Resolution: Warfarin has likely contributed to this rectus sheath hematoma.
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Meghan Herbst Jul 30
Replying to @UltrasoundStuff
If this is a dissection, it's odd the flap isn't mobile. Was it a chronic dissection?
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Meghan Herbst Jul 30
Replying to @EUSmkh
A 53yo female presents with LLQ abdominal pain after standing from a seated position. Here are two clips (labeled 1 & 2) taken over the area of tenderness to palpation. Which of the following medications is she most likely on?
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Meghan Herbst Jul 30
A 53yo female presents with LLQ abdominal pain after standing from a seated position. Here are two clips (labeled 1 & 2) taken over the area of tenderness to palpation. Which of the following medications is she most likely on?
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Meghan Herbst Jul 30
Replying to @EUSmkh
Resolution: 3rd finger tip amputation is the best choice for the median nerve block demonstrated in these clips. Unlike the radial and ulnar nerves, the median nerve is not associated with an artery.
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Meghan Herbst Jul 23
Replying to @EUSmkh
For which injury will this be most effective?
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Meghan Herbst Jul 23
For which injury will this be most effective?
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Meghan Herbst Jul 23
Replying to @EUSmkh
Resolution: AAA w/ intraluminal thrombus (extending into iliac bifurcation). 80% AAAs have intraluminal thrombus, confusing learners to mistake the inner aspect of thrombus for a dissection flap. Dissecting aneurysms are more likely to occur in the thoracic aorta (not abdominal).
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Meghan Herbst Jul 16
Replying to @EUSmkh
Which of the following describes this clip most accurately?
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Meghan Herbst Jul 16
Which of the following describes this clip most accurately?
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Meghan Herbst retweeted
Dharmesh Shukla Jul 14
Severe exacerbation of meralgia paresthetica pain, not responding to opiates, relieved within minutes of ED arrival guided blockade of Lateral Cutaneous Nerve of Thigh with levobupivacaine = pain gone for 12+h (not as bad when block ended 16 h later.)
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