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Bram Hubbell 24 Jan 19
Q3: For many of us, the story of the Revolutions in Period 5 (1750-1900) focuses on people of European descent. How can we challenge that pattern and foreground peoples of African and indigenous heritage?
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Thanasis Kinias 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
A3: the most obvious way is to make Haïti an integral part of the AoR, but another important theme IMO is that of Black Loyalists in the AmRev and their resettlement in Nova Scotia and later Sierra Leone—the Black Loyalists complicate the emancipatory narrative of the AmRev 1/
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Thanasis Kinias 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
We can also tell the story of 7Yr War/AmRev/1812 with Indigenous peoples at the center—what do these stories mean for the autonomy of First Nations/Native Americans? How does increasing settler self-government affect Indigenous peoples? 2/
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Thanasis Kinias 24 Jan 19
Replying to @bramhubbell
I also heard a paper at on Indigenous royalism during LAm wars of independence—poor Indigenous people didn’t see rich white liberals as their champions and tended to fight for the monarchy, which again complicates our story of liberation in AoR 3/
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Eric Beckman 24 Jan 19
In Settler Colonialism ep of a panelist (sorry, can't tell if it was you) explained that settlers rhetorically erased indigenous people before displacing many demographically. We to need consciously avoid replicating this in our classes
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Eric Beckman
A3 Alan Taylor's *Internal Enemy* taught me a lot about how the British 1812 represented freedom for enslaved people. Tracing freed people moving from US to Nova Scotia to Sierra Leone could make for a great story or activity for students
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Thanasis Kinias 25 Jan 19
And if you wanted to extend the thread further, a look at Africville—the Black community outside Halifax originally settled by Black Loyalists and demolished by “urban renewal” in the 1960s—could make a link back to this from the 20th century.
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