Twitter | Search | |
Sam Ghali, M.D.
ER Doctor | Resuscitation | Airway | Cardiovascular Emergencies | ECGs | Emergency Ultrasound | Trauma | Critical Care | | Patient Advocate
7,789
Tweets
218
Following
100,672
Followers
Tweets
Sam Ghali, M.D. 11h
Undocumented abnormal ventricular activation
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. 11h
I would consider the possibility of these being Cardiac Memory T waves.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. 13h
Stellar way to tag , I must say. 😄
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. 13h
Beware of Shark Fin. Great case!
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 20
Replying to @smy__xo
♥️
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 19
Replying to @EMCases
Would have to read the actual study (not just the abstract). Success on first attempt significantly decreased. Not sure if they are saying 95% success was the result of just this technique. If they are, that is not realistic and one must seriously question the external validity.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 19
Dr. Fauci has been the leading U.S infectious disease expert since 1984. Raise your hand if you want a president who listens to him.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 19
Replying to @BriannaCakes93
😂
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. retweeted
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Watch this video of one of my residents reducing a dislocated shoulder after an Interscalene Nerve Block. Keep an eye on the shoulder or you’ll miss it. This is why I haven’t had to do a conscious sedation for shoulder dislocation in years. (With consent)
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 19
Replying to @EMCases
I like the Cunningham and have had success with it as well, but for it to work you gotta have the right patient. You don’t lose anything to try but it’s definitely not as effective.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 19
Replying to @Aidan_Baron @amit_pawa
If you focus on depositing the anesthetic around C5 you can probably use ~10 mL, but depositing a little bit more increases chances of success, decreases chances of having to poke again.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Replying to @rjVACHAS
No we do are own blocks in the ER.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Intra articular lido can take the edge off but I must say does not compare to an interscalene block
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Replying to @DrMLivingston
Ah yes, like Happy Gilmore talking the golf ball in the hole.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Replying to @knottyhead
Yup nurses love it. You could do it in children but definitely would not do it in the young as sitting still is a prerequisite.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Agree with all of the above.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Replying to @rebeccahughesmd
You should expect that they will get some phrenic nerve blockade with hemidiaphragm paralysis. Never an issue. If I thought it would be, wouldn’t do the block but yet to encounter that scenario.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Replying to @EM_RESUS
15 ml of Lidocaine, no narcotics, no sedatives.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Circumflex (or one of its Obtuse Marginal Branches)
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Ghali, M.D. Oct 18
Replying to @EM_RESUS
UPDATE: This tweet has been removed by Twitter for violating its rules against spreading false and harmful information about COVID-19.
Reply Retweet Like