Twitter | Search | |
ECU EM
Official twitter of the East Carolina University Emergency Medicine Residency Program.
2,293
Tweets
134
Following
903
Followers
Tweets
ECU EM Aug 30
Patient with h/o epilepsy p/w obtubdation and hyperammonemia? Think valproic acid overdose.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 30
AMS with Abnl reflexes, Argyle-Robertson pupils? Consider Neurosyphillis.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 30
Asterixis, ascites, angiomata - think hepatic encephalopathy as cause of AMS
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 30
Normal pressure hydrocephalus: wet, wacky, and wobbly.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Don’t assume that hospitals are safe places for elderly and frail patients. Not all elderly people need to be admitted. -Quinn
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
When considering fever in the elderly think: UTI, pneumonia, and skin infection.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Frailty - the mismatch between chronological age and physical age.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Did you know there’s a clinical frailty scale??
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
It’s time for Grand Rounds! Dr. Joe Quinn is teaching about the approach to the elderly patient.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Brown-Sequard Syndrome - the inservice and boards love to ask about this!
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Central cord lesion: upper extremities effected more than lower extremities.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Central cord syndrome: most common incomplete cord syndrome. Cause: Hyperextension of neck.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Spinal shock: concussive injury to the spinal cord. Return of the bulbocavernosus reflex is the 1st sign of cord recovery.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Dr. Meggs is going to sit for the ConCERT exam for the 4th time in Sept! Can you imagine the things he’s seen in his career?
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
C3/4/5 keeps the diaphragm alive!
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Spinal mets most likely to be located in the thoracic spine.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Malignant spinal cord lesions: 20% are vertebral mets. (Usu from lung, breast or prostate).
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Bilateral facet dislocation: highly unstable. Don’t miss this!
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Clay Shoveler’s fracture: stable fracture. Treatment: supportive care, immobilization.
Reply Retweet Like
ECU EM Aug 16
Spinal lesions, fractures and infections discussion led by our professor of EM, Dr. Meggs!
Reply Retweet Like