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Thomas Zurbuchen 22 Jun 19
While increased methane levels measured by are exciting, as possible indicators for life, it’s important to remember this is an early science result. To maintain scientific integrity, the team will continue to analyze the data before confirming results.
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Thomas Zurbuchen
We don’t yet know where methane on Mars comes from. A leading idea is that methane on Mars is being released from underground reservoirs created by past biology. But sometimes, methane is a sign of geology rather than biology. Learn more:
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PH₃-nominal 💀xDEADCE11 22 Jun 19
Replying to @Dr_ThomasZ
This is so interesting. I just perused the NASA article and I'm kind of stumped -- they pin geological factors for methane release, but there haven't been active volcanic regions on Mars for millions of years. Why the 10x increase in Aresstrical detection in specific areas?
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PH₃-nominal 💀xDEADCE11 23 Jun 19
Replying to @Dr_ThomasZ
Gah -- blame autocorrect; I meant "Arestrial" after Ares.
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PH₃-nominal 💀xDEADCE11 22 Jun 19
Replying to @Dr_ThomasZ
It sounds to me that if there were Arrestrical volcanism involved in the emission and detection of methane in-situ, would there not have had to be recent volcanic activity to release the chemical whiffs for the on-Mars scintillator to pick up, or am I missing something?
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OldManJohnson 22 Jun 19
Replying to @Horrgs @Dr_ThomasZ
And even if it were said microbes, they would be SO small in number that they probably wouldn't register on any of the Rover's sensors.
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tranquility base 22 Jun 19
Replying to @Dr_ThomasZ
But seasonal implies current biological processes at work. Period of activity/hibernation.
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Le Planétolog 23 Jun 19
Replying to @reddoggy1
Not necessarily. For example, this paper proposes that the seasonal cycle can be explained by interactions with the regolith:
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Cephas 22 Jun 19
Replying to @Dr_ThomasZ @Deivily2
lê tudo
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Sal rodriguez 22 Jun 19
Replying to @Dr_ThomasZ
Start drilling
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Ankur Bhatnagar 23 Jun 19
A related question, where does the methane eventually go, or does it remain forever in the Martian atmosphere?
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