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Philip Wood 6 Jun 18
An important comment here. We could add that there was already a translation movement from Greek to in the seventh century at (eg.) Qeneshre. This expertise provided a framework for translations from Greek to Syriac to Arabic in Baghdad in ninth century
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Philip Wood
Ibn al-Nadim's Fihrist gives a wonderful evocation of the cosmopolitanism of the Baghdad of his day. He names some 61 translators: 38 nestorian, 1 maronite, 9 jacobite, 11 melkite, 1 sabaean, 1 'Persian'.
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @DrPhilipWood
but this diversity isn't something ignored in contemporary scholarship, it is well acknowledged; the major works on the translation movement i.e. Gutas and Saliba, all stress the Syriac/Christian aspect
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Guillaume Dye 6 Jun 18
Oh, I would not really agree about Gutas. To my mind, he has a tendency, to downplay the Syriac movement Philip is referring to. Good corrective to this in Jack 's excellent dissertation
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Syed 6 Jun 18
Replying to @DrPhilipWood
Also, as Dmitri Gutas argues, Persians pushed translations due to the anxiety of losing their heritage with Arab conquests. Ibn Muqaffa was a Zoroastrian convert, Mashaallah was a Persian jew, Nawbakht a Zoroastrian & his son Abu Sahl wrote the first Arabic text on cosmology.
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Amin Nayebpour 6 Jun 18
I’ve been investigating this for years and it seems it falls on deaf ears. Particularly the influence of Zoroastrian political thought on the falsafa tradition, especially in Farabi. Good to know I’m not alone! The problem is people doing philosophy and Iraniatik don’t talk!
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Dame Averil Cameron 6 Jun 18
Replying to @DrPhilipWood
Gives tyeclie to the standard line that Greek learning passed into Arabic directly
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