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Pamela Keel
Scientist, author, psychology professor, eating disorders researcher
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Pamela Keel 6h
Replying to @RynLinthicum
I also feel compelled to add that has a fantastic clinical program. All stats are taught in house by amazing faculty and extend to a range of advanced methods, we have a teaching practicum, we have strong collaborations across labs, and great grad student outcomes!
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Pamela Keel 6h
Replying to @RynLinthicum
This is awesome and consistent with Nalini Ambady’s research on “thin slices” - our initial reactions to a person tend to predict our reactions over longer periods of exposure. It’s one reason to pay attention to these responses when making important life choices!
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Pamela Keel Aug 16
Replying to @cbulik
Thank you!
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Pamela Keel Aug 16
Beyond all things I’ve wanted to tell my son as he starts college, I’ve also had a lot to tell myself, including: He’s becoming an adult. That means learning to fix his own mistakes. That means he has to make mistakes. We’ll both be okay just like every parent & child doing this
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Pamela Keel retweeted
Academy for E.D. Aug 15
The Call for Abstracts for ICED 2020 is right around the corner! Visit to view additional dates to remember, including early bird registration, call for applications, and more!
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Pamela Keel Aug 15
For those doing research, a great offer from the great
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Pamela Keel Aug 15
Replying to @CaraBohon @hagan_ke
But we don’t know if that’s because they persisted in seeking more treatment - which is more likely for symptomatic than remitted individuals to be sure! Or if we’re observing individual differences in the natural course of the disorder 2/2
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Pamela Keel Aug 15
Replying to @CaraBohon @hagan_ke
I don’t think we know that. We know that people catch up over time with long term follow-up such that initial differences in CBT vs. IPT vs. meds vs. placebo (!) disappear when you follow them years later. People who didn’t start with the best treatment can recover 1/
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Pamela Keel Aug 14
Replying to @JohnHolbein1
To my pre-tenure self: Seek mentorship on how to mentor grad students. Don’t just do what you wanted as a grad student.
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Pamela Keel Aug 14
Replying to @erinereilly22
Cool! Focusing on one study allows you to be more selective in getting one with info needed and one that seems feasible. It will also make grading more fair. And it will yield more illustrative findings - maybe you could even publish them!
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Pamela Keel Aug 14
Replying to @erinereilly22
Will you pick a single study and have different groups of students attempt to independently replicate results? This could be super cool because it could expand concept of replication beyond simple yes/no dichotomy, reinforcing probability as a distribution.
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Pamela Keel retweeted
Carolyn Kylstra Aug 13
Bumping this, because I want to talk a bit about 's approach to fitness. It's evolved a lot over the past few years, and we're looking for an editor who can help us grow even more.
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Pamela Keel Aug 14
Replying to @CaraBohon @hagan_ke
When survival analyses used in naturalistic follow-up of it often looks like more treatment contributes to worse outcome, but that’s because continued symptoms drive treatment use
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Pamela Keel Aug 14
Replying to @CaraBohon @hagan_ke
Alternative interpretation: patients need different durations of treatment to reach the same outcomes. You need a survival analysis (not used) to show that people reached the same outcome after the same amount of treatment and that continued treatment added nothing.
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Pamela Keel Aug 13
So true! At the assistant professor level, letters can have a greater impact because applicants have had the opportunity to demonstrate certain skills (get large grants, mentor doctoral students, etc...)
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Pamela Keel Aug 13
5. You can always look at current faculty to see where they came from and scholarship. This may be the best way to understand what a department is seeking - who have they already hired? Good luck! 5/5
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Pamela Keel Aug 13
4. In contrast (for other ads you may see), programs at smaller or regional colleges more focused on teaching are less likely to have funds to interview applicants from outside the US 4/
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Pamela Keel Aug 13
3. Positions at research universities with doctoral programs advertising in outlets with international reach should be okay with inviting applicants from outside US for interviews 3/
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Pamela Keel Aug 13
2. Do you have a track record of getting grants to support your research or will your letter writers speak knowledgeably about your high potential to get funding? 2/
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Pamela Keel Aug 13
Here are a few factors that might help you figure out if you will be a good fit for an position in the US. 1. Qualifications - for this job, do you have a doctoral degree in media studies or has your degree helped you publish in this field’s journals? 1/
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